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Opinions March 13, 2013

March 13, 2013
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Kelly S. Thomas v. Dushan Zatecky, superintendent, Pendleton Correctional Facility
13-1136
U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division, Judge Sarah Evans Barker.
Civil. Denies Thomas’ request that he be allowed collateral relief to file appeals without regard to the fees required by Section 1913 and the resolutions of the Judicial Conference. Gives Thomas 21 days to file in the 7th Circuit a motion for permission to proceed in forma pauperis and a certificate of appealability. Failure to meet this schedule will result in dismissal for failure to prosecute.

Indiana Supreme Court
Brandy L. Walczak, Individually and on Behalf of Those Similarly Situated v. Labor Works - Fort Wayne LLC, d/b/a Labor Works
02S04-1208-PL-497
Civil plenary. Concludes that Walczak had a reasonable expectation of continuing to receive job assignments from Labor Works on the day she filed her claim, and holds that she was not separated from the payroll for the purpose of the Wage Claims Act and may proceed with her claims as she filed it under the Wage Payment Act.

Indiana Court of Appeals
N.O. v. State of Indiana (NFP)

71A03-1209-JV-409
Juvenile. Affirms adjudication as a delinquent child for committing what would be Class B misdemeanor battery if committed by an adult.

Michael A. Combs v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A03-1209-CR-393
Criminal. Affirms convictions of and sentence for three counts of Class B felony neglect of a dependent, Class A felony child molesting and Class D felony battery.

Troy Farris v. State of Indiana (NFP)

49A04-1207-CR-372
Criminal. Affirms 180-day sentence imposed following probation violation.

Sedrick J. Grandberry v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A03-1209-CR-410
Criminal. Affirms sentence for Class D felony criminal trespass.

Tyler Becker v. State of Indiana (NFP)
57A03-1203-CR-124
Criminal. Affirms conviction and sentence for Class A misdemeanor operating while intoxicated.

Joshua D. Huff v. State of Indiana (NFP)

06A01-1208-CR-396
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B felony burglary.

Benjamin Mentink v. Karen Downing (NFP)

45A03-1207-PO-332
Protective order. Affirms issuance of protective order against Mentink.

Victoria Anderson v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A02-1207-CR-603
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B misdemeanor criminal mischief.

J.A.H. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
71A04-1210-JV-541
Juvenile. Affirms order committing J.A.H. to the Indiana Department of Correction.

Lavern Baltimore v. State of Indiana (NFP)

22A04-1112-PC-652
Post conviction. Reverses denial of petition for post-conviction relief and remands for further proceedings.

Bruce Anderson v. State of Indiana (NFP)
53A05-1209-CR-482
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class A misdemeanor battery resulting in bodily injury.

Pat Fleming and Bob Steffan d/b/a Dr. Bob's RV Service v. Santander Consumer USA, Inc. and Gemb Lending, Inc. (NFP)
45A03-1206-PL-249
Civil plenary. Reverses dismissal of complaint to foreclose upon mechanic’s liens and remands for additional proceedings.

The Indiana Tax Court issued no opinions prior to IL deadline.

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  1. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  2. If the end result is to simply record the spoke word, then perhaps some day digital recording may eventually be the status quo. However, it is a shallow view to believe the professional court reporter's function is to simply report the spoken word and nothing else. There are many aspects to being a professional court reporter, and many aspects involved in producing a professional and accurate transcript. A properly trained professional steno court reporter has achieved a skill set in a field where the average dropout rate in court reporting schools across the nation is 80% due to the difficulty of mastering the necessary skills. To name just a few "extras" that a court reporter with proper training brings into a courtroom or a deposition suite; an understanding of legal procedure, technology specific to the legal profession, and an understanding of what is being said by the attorneys and litigants (which makes a huge difference in the quality of the transcript). As to contracting, or anti-contracting the argument is simple. The court reporter as governed by our ethical standards is to be the independent, unbiased individual in a deposition or courtroom setting. When one has entered into a contract with any party, insurance carrier, etc., then that reporter is no longer unbiased. I have been a court reporter for over 30 years and I echo Mr. Richardson's remarks that I too am here to serve.

  3. A competitive bid process is ethical and appropriate especially when dealing with government agencies and large corporations, but an ethical line is crossed when court reporters in Pittsburgh start charging exorbitant fees on opposing counsel. This fee shifting isn't just financially biased, it undermines the entire justice system, giving advantages to those that can afford litigation the most. It makes no sense.

  4. "a ttention to detail is an asset for all lawyers." Well played, Indiana Lawyer. Well played.

  5. I have a appeals hearing for the renewal of my LPN licenses and I need an attorney, the ones I have spoke to so far want the money up front and I cant afford that. I was wondering if you could help me find one that takes payments or even a pro bono one. I live in Indiana just north of Indianapolis.

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