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Opinions May 21, 2014

May 21, 2014
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Indiana Court of Appeals
Jacob Herron v. State of Indiana
56A03-1306-CR-210
Criminal. Reverses convictions of Class B felony burglary and Class D felony receiving stolen property. The jury may have relied on the impeachment evidence as substantive evidence in this case. Remands for retrial, if the state chooses. Judge Riley dissents in part, finding enough circumstantial evidence to convict Herron.

Tierra Rae Pierson, a Minor, Deceased, by her next friend and parent, Betina Pierson, and Betina Pierson, Individually, and Ryan Pierson, Individually v. Service America Corporation, et al.
49A02-1307-CT-561
Civil tort. Reverses summary judgment in favor of Centerplate on the Piersons’ negligence claim. Reasonable inferences to be drawn from the designated materials could permit a fact-finder to conclude that a Centerplate designee served Gaff beer while knowing him to be visibly intoxicated. Gaff later drove while intoxicated and struck and killed Tierra Rae Pierson. As Centerplate did not, based upon undisputed facts, negate an element of the negligence claim, summary judgment was improvidently granted.

Wayne Hurd v. State of Indiana
49A02-1309-CR-753
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class B misdemeanor battery and the decision to exclude Hurd’s mother as a witness. Reverses imposition of a probation condition that Hurd not go within a nearly 2-mile radius of 38th and College in Indianapolis. Remands with instructions to vacate any pending probation violations based upon that condition. The trial court abused its discretion in imposing that condition because it was not reasonably related to his treatment and the protection of the public safety.  

Jeremy Lyn Davis v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A02-1307-CR-670
Criminal. Affirms seven-year sentence for Class C felony battery by means of a deadly weapon.

Brice L. Webb v. State of Indiana (NFP)
71A05-1305-CR-263
Criminal. Affirms murder conviction.

Brandan L. Martin v. State of Indiana (NFP)
52A02-1311-CR-966
Criminal. Affirms four-year sentence for Class D felony possession of marijuana and Class A misdemeanor battery.

Tina Cox v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A04-1309-CR-447
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class D felony possession of methamphetamine.

In the Matter of: J.J., F.J., J.O., & C.O., Minor Children, and M.O., Mother v. The Indiana Department of Child Services (NFP)
06A01-1310-JC-479
Juvenile. Affirms determination that the four children are children in need of services.

The Indiana Supreme Court and Tax Court posted no opinions by IL deadline. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals posted no Indiana decisions by IL deadline.
 

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  1. Is it possible to amend an order for child support due to false paternity?

  2. He did not have an "unlicensed handgun" in his pocket. Firearms are not licensed in Indiana. He apparently possessed a handgun without a license to carry, but it's not the handgun that is licensed (or registered).

  3. Once again, Indiana's legislature proves how friendly it is to monopolies. This latest bill by Hershman demonstrates the lengths Indiana's representatives are willing to go to put big business's (especially utilities') interests above those of everyday working people. Maassal argues that if the technology (solar) is so good, it will be able to compete on its own. Too bad he doesn't feel the same way about the industries he represents. Instead, he wants to cut the small credit consumers get for using solar in order to "add a 'level of certainty'" to his industry. I haven't heard of or seen such a blatant money-grab by an industry since the days when our federal, state, and local governments were run by the railroad. Senator Hershman's constituents should remember this bill the next time he runs for office, and they should penalize him accordingly.

  4. From his recent appearance on WRTV to this story here, Frank is everywhere. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy, although he should stop using Eric Schnauffer for his 7th Circuit briefs. They're not THAT hard.

  5. They learn our language prior to coming here. My grandparents who came over on the boat, had to learn English and become familiarize with Americas customs and culture. They are in our land now, speak ENGLISH!!

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