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Opinions Nov. 16, 2010

November 16, 2010
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Indiana Supreme Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals
Kevin L. Hampton v. State of Indiana
84A04-1002-PC-122
Post conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief. There was no error in omitting the requested sentence and appellate counsel did not fail to provide effective assistance.

State of Indiana v. J.S.
49A02-1004-JV-567
Juvenile. Affirms dismissal of delinquency petition against J.S. after he was found incompetent to stand trial. Given the extensive expert reports finding J.S. incompetent, the juvenile court did not abuse its discretion in finding him incompetent to stand trial. The charges should not remain pending to see if he regains competency before he is 18 and the record reveals his family is aware of his problems and trying to help him.

Vaughn A. Reeves, Jr. v. State of Indiana
77A04-1005-CR-292
Criminal. Affirms in part denial of Reeves’ motion to dismiss 10 counts of Class C felony aiding, inducing, or causing securities fraud. Because a portion of the 10 charging informations, on their face, allege a time period outside the statute of limitations and do not allege facts sufficient to constitute an exception to the statute, the trial court should have granted, in part, Reeves’ motion to dismiss as to these dates that fell outside the statute of limitation. Remands for consideration, as set forth in Indiana Code Section 35-34-1-4(d), of whether the trial court will discharge the defendant as to specific dates or deny the discharge upon determining that the prosecutor would be entitled to cure the information by amendment.

Blake Parkins v. State of Indiana (NFP)
29A02-1002-CR-345
Criminal. Affirms conviction of criminal recklessness with the use of a motor vehicle as a Class A misdemeanor.

Christina Smith v. State of Indiana (NFP)
15A01-1003-CR-153
Criminal. Revises sentence following Smith’s guilty plea to Class C felony reckless homicide and remands for trial court to impose sentence of four years with two years suspended.

Jamarr Da-Juan Williams v. State of Indiana (NFP)
45A03-1001-CR-39
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class A felony voluntary manslaughter, Class C felony battery, and Class C felony attempted battery.

Jane Marie Burkart v. State of Indiana (NFP)
46A03-0908-CR-385
Criminal. Affirms convictions of and sentence for five counts of Class B misdemeanor abandonment or neglect of vertebrate animals.

Kenneth W. Ellis v. State of Indiana (NFP)
25A03-1007-CR-407
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to dealing in cocaine as a Class B felony.

Antonio Simeone, et al. v. Schreiber Lumber, Inc., et al. (NFP)
49A02-1002-CP-177
Civil plenary. Affirms judgment in favor of Dave Beck on negligence and constructive fraud claims, partial summary judgment for Schreiber Lumber, Bova’s counterclaim for breach of contract, and that the evidence supports the trial court judgment.

Jason Montgomery v. State of Indiana (NFP)
17A04-1002-CR-95
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to Class B felony burglary.

Michael J. Kempf v. State of Indiana (NFP)
65A01-1003-CR-134
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class D felony operating a vehicle while an habitual traffic offender.

Raymond Hannah v. State of Indiana (NFP)
48A04-1004-CR-225
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to Class C felony nonsupport of a dependent child.

Christopher Martin v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A04-1003-CR-152
Criminal. Affirms sentence following conviction of Class C felony reckless homicide.

Justin Stanback v. State of Indiana (NFP)
49A05-1004-CR-251
Criminal. Reverses denial of Stanback’s request to file a belated notice of appeal and remands for further proceedings.

Cory R. Dowden v. State of Indiana (NFP)
34A02-1004-CR-562
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to Class D felony receiving stolen property.

Indiana Tax Court had posted no opinions at IL deadline.
 

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  1. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  2. If the end result is to simply record the spoke word, then perhaps some day digital recording may eventually be the status quo. However, it is a shallow view to believe the professional court reporter's function is to simply report the spoken word and nothing else. There are many aspects to being a professional court reporter, and many aspects involved in producing a professional and accurate transcript. A properly trained professional steno court reporter has achieved a skill set in a field where the average dropout rate in court reporting schools across the nation is 80% due to the difficulty of mastering the necessary skills. To name just a few "extras" that a court reporter with proper training brings into a courtroom or a deposition suite; an understanding of legal procedure, technology specific to the legal profession, and an understanding of what is being said by the attorneys and litigants (which makes a huge difference in the quality of the transcript). As to contracting, or anti-contracting the argument is simple. The court reporter as governed by our ethical standards is to be the independent, unbiased individual in a deposition or courtroom setting. When one has entered into a contract with any party, insurance carrier, etc., then that reporter is no longer unbiased. I have been a court reporter for over 30 years and I echo Mr. Richardson's remarks that I too am here to serve.

  3. A competitive bid process is ethical and appropriate especially when dealing with government agencies and large corporations, but an ethical line is crossed when court reporters in Pittsburgh start charging exorbitant fees on opposing counsel. This fee shifting isn't just financially biased, it undermines the entire justice system, giving advantages to those that can afford litigation the most. It makes no sense.

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