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Opinions Oct. 18, 2013

October 18, 2013
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Indiana Court of Appeals
Floyd Weddle v. State of Indiana
73A01-1209-CR-452
Criminal. Affirms on rehearing that convictions for possession of methamphetamine and manufacturing methamphetamine were not double jeopardy, and finding that the jury could have reasonably concluded that Weddle was in possession of methamphetamine and was in the process of manufacturing an additional amount of the drug.

David Rhodes v. State of Indiana
49A02-1304-CR-321
Criminal. Affirms conviction of two counts of theft, rejecting arguments that evidence from a police search of a suspect should have been suppressed. The panel found that the record shows that Rhodes made no objection to admission of the evidence that he later sought to suppress, so the argument had been waived. Even if it hadn’t been waived, an eyewitness description that led police to Rhodes provided probable cause.

Audie Wilson v. State of Indiana
49A02-1210-CR-846
Criminal. Affirms Wilson’s convictions for sexual misconduct with a minor, as a Class B felony; attempted sexual misconduct with a minor, as a Class B felony; and sexual misconduct with a minor, as a Class C felony. Finds the trial court did not abuse its discretion in allowing the evidence of defendant’s nicknames. Rules the defendant had the burden to proof – not the state – as to whether he reasonably believed the juvenile victim was at least 16 years old.  

Timothy S. Enders and Enders & Longway Builders, Inc., v. Debra Sue Enders as Personal Representative of the Estate of Randall Enders
71A03-1211-PL-494
Civil plenary. Grants petition for rehearing but stands by previous opinion. Court was not persuaded by Timothy Enders’s argument that the COA found the shares of the corporation were not jointly owned with rights of survivorship. Finds since the trial court properly dissolved the family business, the issues about the shares certificates should have been resolved by the trial court.

Chad Musick v. State of Indiana (NFP)
18A04-1302-PC-61
Post conviction. Affirms the denial of Musick’s post-conviction relief petition to the extent the post-conviction court found he did not receive ineffective assistance of appellate counsel. Reverses the denial with respect to the claim of ineffective assistance of trial counsel and remands for further proceedings on that claim.

Jolene G. Burtrum v. Citizens Health Center (NFP)
49A05-1305-PL-224
Civil plenary. Affirms dismissal of Burtrum’s complaint against Citizens Health Center, alleging breach of contract and seeking damages under the Wage Claim Statute.

J.M. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
52A02-1304-JV-361
Juvenile. Affirms order placing J.M. in the Indiana Department of Correction after he admitted to theft from a Burger King restaurant.

Christopher T. Taylor v. State of Indiana (NFP)
29A02-1301-PC-54
Post conviction. Affirms summary disposition regarding Taylor’s freestanding claims of error and ineffective assistance of counsel claim on the presumptive sentencing scheme. Reverses and remands denial of Taylor’s motion for an evidentiary hearing on the remaining ineffective assistance of counsel claims.

Louis O'Neal v. State of Indiana (NFP)
20A03-1302-PC-58
Post conviction. Affirms the denial of O’Neal’s motion to withdraw his post-conviction petition without prejudice.

Gregory Calvain v. State of Indiana (NFP)
41A01-1303-CR-116
Criminal. Affirms conviction of illegal consumption of an alcoholic beverage, a Class C misdemeanor.

Martin Cenfetelli v. State of Indiana (NFP)
84A01-1303-CR-118
Criminal. Affirms Cenfetelli’s 14-year sentence, $2,000 fine and five-year suspension of driver’s license for conviction of Class B felony operating a vehicle with a blood alcohol content of 0.15 or more causing death. Reverses home detention and community service as conditions of probation. Reverses and remands for further proceedings regarding the restitution order for $101,198.24.

The Indiana Supreme Court and the Indiana Tax Court did not post any opinions by IL deadline. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals submitted no Indiana opinions by IL deadline.
 

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  1. The ADA acts as a tax upon all for the benefit of a few. And, most importantly, the many have no individual say in whether they pay the tax. Those with handicaps suffered in military service should get a pass, but those who are handicapped by accident or birth do NOT deserve that pass. The drivel about "equal access" is spurious because the handicapped HAVE equal access, they just can't effectively use it. That is their problem, not society's. The burden to remediate should be that of those who seek the benefit of some social, constructional, or dimensional change, NOT society generally. Everybody wants to socialize the costs and concentrate the benefits of government intrusion so that they benefit and largely avoid the costs. This simply maintains the constant push to the slop trough, and explains, in part, why the nation is 20 trillion dollars in the hole.

  2. Hey 2 psychs is never enough, since it is statistically unlikely that three will ever agree on anything! New study admits this pseudo science is about as scientifically valid as astrology ... done by via fortune cookie ....John Ioannidis, professor of health research and policy at Stanford University, said the study was impressive and that its results had been eagerly awaited by the scientific community. “Sadly, the picture it paints - a 64% failure rate even among papers published in the best journals in the field - is not very nice about the current status of psychological science in general, and for fields like social psychology it is just devastating,” he said. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/aug/27/study-delivers-bleak-verdict-on-validity-of-psychology-experiment-results

  3. Indianapolis Bar Association President John Trimble and I are on the same page, but it is a very large page with plenty of room for others to join us. As my final Res Gestae article will express in more detail in a few days, the Great Recession hastened a fundamental and permanent sea change for the global legal service profession. Every state bar is facing the same existential questions that thrust the medical profession into national healthcare reform debates. The bench, bar, and law schools must comprehensively reconsider how we define the practice of law and what it means to access justice. If the three principals of the legal service profession do not recast the vision of their roles and responsibilities soon, the marketplace will dictate those roles and responsibilities without regard for the public interests that the legal profession professes to serve.

  4. I have met some highly placed bureaucrats who vehemently disagree, Mr. Smith. This is not your father's time in America. Some ideas are just too politically incorrect too allow spoken, says those who watch over us for the good of their concept of order.

  5. Lets talk about this without forgetting that Lawyers, too, have FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND ASSOCIATION

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