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Opinions Oct. 24, 2012

October 24, 2012
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Supreme Court and Tax Court posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

Leslie Ann Grider v. State of Indiana
48A02-1112-CR-1156
Criminal. Reverses 19-year sentence following guilty pleas to two counts of Class C felony forgery, four counts of Class D felony theft, and two counts of Class D felony check fraud. The language of the plea agreement indicates the parties’ intention that the trial court would impose concurrent sentences on all counts regardless of the separate cause numbers. Orders Grider’s sentences to be concurrent for a total of eight years.

Rick Singleton, et al. v. Fifth Third Bank
71A04-1202-MF-83
Mortgage foreclosure. Reverses ruling in favor of Fifth Third Bank on its renewed motion for entry of agreed final judgment. Based upon the forbearance agreement and a directive to wire funds to make the final payment, Singleton’s payment was not untimely and did not constitute a termination event under the forbearance agreement. Remands for further proceedings.

Harry E. Knauff, Jr. and Carolyn R. Knauff v. Nathan T. Hovermale and Sarah E. Hovermale
52A05-1111-PL-584
Civil plenary. Affirms judgment quieting title in certain real property in the names of the Hovermales following a bench trial. The Knauffs didn’t show that the trial court clearly erred when it concluded that they failed to establish the control element of adverse possession. Judge Kirsch dissents without opinion.

Lonnie D. Covey v. State of Indiana (NFP)
90A02-1204-CR-284
Criminal. Affirms conviction and sentence for Class C felony forgery.

Lamar Herron, Jr. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A04-1201-CR-58
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to Class B felony dealing in cocaine.

Joshua C. Johnson v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A03-1203-CR-130
Criminal. Affirms convictions and sentence for five counts of child molesting, three as Class A felonies and two as Class C felonies; one count of Class C felony child exploitation; one count of Class D felony possession of child pornography; and two counts of Class D felony dissemination of matter harmful to minors.

Robert V. Kirts v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A02-1202-CR-122
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class C felonies operating a vehicle while intoxicated resulting in death and failure to stop after an accident resulting in death.

 

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  1. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  2. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  3. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  4. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

  5. Oh yes, lifetime tenure. The Founders gave that to the federal judges .... at that time no federal district courts existed .... so we are talking the Supreme Court justices only in context ....so that they could rule against traditional marriage and for the other pet projects of the sixties generation. Right. Hmmmm, but I must admit, there is something from that time frame that seems to recommend itself in this context ..... on yes, from a document the Founders penned in 1776: " He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good."

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