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Opinions Oct. 24, 2012

October 24, 2012
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7th Circuit Court of Appeals posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Supreme Court and Tax Court posted no opinions at IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals

Leslie Ann Grider v. State of Indiana
48A02-1112-CR-1156
Criminal. Reverses 19-year sentence following guilty pleas to two counts of Class C felony forgery, four counts of Class D felony theft, and two counts of Class D felony check fraud. The language of the plea agreement indicates the parties’ intention that the trial court would impose concurrent sentences on all counts regardless of the separate cause numbers. Orders Grider’s sentences to be concurrent for a total of eight years.

Rick Singleton, et al. v. Fifth Third Bank
71A04-1202-MF-83
Mortgage foreclosure. Reverses ruling in favor of Fifth Third Bank on its renewed motion for entry of agreed final judgment. Based upon the forbearance agreement and a directive to wire funds to make the final payment, Singleton’s payment was not untimely and did not constitute a termination event under the forbearance agreement. Remands for further proceedings.

Harry E. Knauff, Jr. and Carolyn R. Knauff v. Nathan T. Hovermale and Sarah E. Hovermale
52A05-1111-PL-584
Civil plenary. Affirms judgment quieting title in certain real property in the names of the Hovermales following a bench trial. The Knauffs didn’t show that the trial court clearly erred when it concluded that they failed to establish the control element of adverse possession. Judge Kirsch dissents without opinion.

Lonnie D. Covey v. State of Indiana (NFP)
90A02-1204-CR-284
Criminal. Affirms conviction and sentence for Class C felony forgery.

Lamar Herron, Jr. v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A04-1201-CR-58
Criminal. Affirms sentence following guilty plea to Class B felony dealing in cocaine.

Joshua C. Johnson v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A03-1203-CR-130
Criminal. Affirms convictions and sentence for five counts of child molesting, three as Class A felonies and two as Class C felonies; one count of Class C felony child exploitation; one count of Class D felony possession of child pornography; and two counts of Class D felony dissemination of matter harmful to minors.

Robert V. Kirts v. State of Indiana (NFP)
79A02-1202-CR-122
Criminal. Affirms convictions of Class C felonies operating a vehicle while intoxicated resulting in death and failure to stop after an accident resulting in death.

 

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  1. Hail to our Constitutional Law Expert in the Executive Office! “What you’re not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law,” Obama said.

  2. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  3. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  4. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  5. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

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