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Opinions Oct. 29, 2012

October 29, 2012
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The following are not-for-publication opinions released by IL deadline.

Indiana Court of Appeals
Betty J. Angel v. Kent H. Powelson and Marjorie A. Powelson
82A04-1205-PL-292
Civil plenary. Affirms order granting part of the Powelsons’ summary judgment motion on Angel’s claims of reformation of a deed and adverse possession. The undisputed evidence shows that both Angel and the Powelsons were granted an easement to use the roadway and both used it for ingress and egress purposes. The evidence also supports Angel’s claim for reformation of a deed is barred by laches.

Shiloh Jones v. State of Indiana
49A04-1202-CR-74
Criminal. Vacates the convictions and sentences for Class A misdemeanors battery and domestic battery due to double jeopardy and affirms conviction and sentence for Class D felony domestic battery. Jones’ conviction for criminal confinement did not violate the prohibition against double jeopardy. The amended sentence imposed by the judge and comments by the prosecutor did not constitute fundamental error.

Aaron Shelton v. State of Indiana (NFP)
02A05-1112-CR-665
Criminal. Affirms convictions of one count of possession of methamphetamine and two counts of possession of a controlled substance, all Class D felonies.

Cheryl E. Webb f/k/a Cheryl E. Wilder and G. Cameron Taylor v. The Bank of New York Mellon (NFP)
49A02-1112-MF-1142
Mortgage foreclosure. Affirms order denying Wilder’s and Taylor’s motion for summary judgment and the grant of summary judgment in favor of the bank. Remands with instructions that the trial court recalculate the amount to award to the bank consistent with this opinion. Chief Judge Margret Robb dissents.
 

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  1. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  2. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  3. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  4. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  5. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

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