Parents, child service provider group sue DCS over subsidies

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In a one-two punch, a pair of lawsuits filed a week apart in December hit the Indiana Department of Child Services square in the gut over how the agency planned to reduce payment rates for foster and adoptive parents and juvenile service providers.

The suits have been combined in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana into a single piece of litigation that raises questions about how these per diem subsidy changes are calculated and what impact they could have on the overall child welfare and juvenile justice system.

Led by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and the Indiana Association of Residential Child Care Agencies (IARCCA), the cases both named as defendants the DCS and Director James Payne, a former juvenile judge in Marion County. The suits represent more than 100 agencies statewide and could potentially impact a class of foster and adoptive parents throughout Indiana.

But the case ties in with a broader picture that goes beyond the per diem payment rate changes that were set to go into effect in 2010 and those within Indiana's juvenile justice system say the DCS decisions could potentially have a detrimental effect on both the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. They claim the policies and decisions being made are jeopardizing effective treatment services and consequently tying judges' hands by reducing their options in doing what's best for children and families.

"This is very concerning because we must provide enough services so that we can, as judges, make reasonable efforts to reunite families and provide the services to children who need it," said Marion Superior Juvenile Judge Marilyn Moores, who pointed out she wasn't familiar with the two cases but has concerns after hearing about the issues. "Any disruption in the provider community is very concerning to judges because our concern is if there will be reasonable services available. If there's not, that jeopardizes what we do."

At issue in the now-combined lawsuits are DCS funds received and allocated under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, which says the state must make foster care maintenance payments for qualified children to cover food, shelter, clothing, daily supervision, personal incidentals, liability insurance, and reasonable travel to the child's home for visitation. Federal law requires that the rates be sufficient to cover those costs, and in exchange for that payment the state DCS receives federal matching funds to cover part of the costs for those services to children.

In setting rates during the past two years, the DCS has scaled down any increases and frozen the rates paid to service providers as budget woes worsened for Indiana. By October, the expected cut for service providers was at 10 percent but it changed by Nov. 30 to between 14 and 20 per- cent with a stern warning from DCS that any provider that didn't agree to the rates within two weeks would have children in their care transferred to other providers.

For foster and adoptive parents, DCS sent a letter in early December notifying them that their monthly payments would be reduced by 10 percent starting Jan. 1, no matter when the placement or adoption took place.

That set the stage for the litigation, and when that DCS-imposed deadline for rate agreements came, the lawsuits began.

Service providers sue

IARCCA, an association of about 110 child welfare agencies providing services to about 4,600 children statewide, filed the first suit in Marion Superior Court Dec. 14. The focus is on the rate cuts announced earlier that month by DCS for agencies providing foster care placements and intensive residential treatment for abused and neglected children. Within two weeks it was removed to federal court, and IARCCA continued its efforts to stop DCS from implementing payment cuts it describes as arbitrary and based solely on budget concerns.

Specifically, the suit cites examples of those cuts, including: Indiana Developmental Training Center in Lafayette and Indianapolis, which services up to 64 and 96 kids respectively and would have to cut even more than the 29 positions already eliminated in both locations; and the Christian Haven residential provider in Jasper County, which expects to eliminate 40 positions including therapists and employees who provide direct care to children.

The suit makes three claims against DCS: It violated Indiana Code 4-22 by not setting reimbursement rates according to promulgated rules; it violated Title IV-E by not offering any written criteria or methods about rate changes and adequacy of what's proposed; and the agency violated the Section 1983 provision of the U.S. Constitution by acting under color of state law in setting arbitrary rates and violating the federal rights of IARCCA and its member agencies.

DCS declined to comment for this story because of the pending litigation, though spokeswoman Ann Houseworth said the agency hopes for a quick resolution and looks forward to continued partnerships with all those committed to the welfare of Indiana's children. After the cuts were announced in early December, DCS Director Payne issued a news release.

"These are incredibly difficult deliberations and everyone involved recognizes the magnitude of the decisions made," he said. "Like other state agencies and business entities, we have spent countless hours trying to find ways to reduce expenses and be good stewards of tax dollars while providing safe, quality care for children... The rate reduction, while unfortunate, still keeps Indiana foster care rates higher than most states."

IARCCA hit the DCS with its first blow within two weeks of the announcement. A second blow came a week later.

Parents follow suit

On Dec. 22, the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed suit on behalf of two adoptive and foster families, with a combined total of nine children who are at the heart of the case. A motion for class certification has been filed, seeking to expand the case for any foster parents who are or will receive foster care maintenance from the DCS, and any current or future foster children for whom any payments are to be made through the DCS.

The lawsuit claims Payne and DCS failed to conduct individual assessments of families and the cost of providing for foster and adoptive children before deciding on the cuts, which will reduce adoption and foster care subsidies so much that parents won't be able to provide for the children's needs.

Both DCS cases have been consolidated, as they deal with similar issues and the same agency decision. A preliminary injunction motion filed Dec. 29 asks the court to stop the state from being able to initiate the reductions while the litigation is ongoing, and a hearing is scheduled for Jan. 20. A class certification request is also pending before the court.


While DCS litigation plays out in court, those in the juvenile justice and child welfare system are concerned the payment changes for foster and adoptive parents will cause more to turn away from these necessary roles, giving the courts and child welfare workers even fewer options for protecting children. Others see this as another piece in a larger puzzle of problems in the DCS in recent years as the DCS has gained more control of the juvenile justice system.

Judge Moores said she fully understands the financial pressures the state and DCS are under but that those monetary concerns can't be the underlying basis for these decisions.

"That was always the fear skeptics had about the DCS making the calls," she said, referring to controversy about the DCS having final say on out-of-state placements. "I fully understand the financial pressure the state is under, but if lower reimbursement rates drive providers out of business, there's a concern that there won't be appropriate services for families and kids.

"I don't know what the answer is," Judge Moores said, "but I certainly hope the best interests of children will remain the primary guiding force."


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  1. I have an open CHINS case I failed a urine screen I have since got clean completed IOP classes now in after care passed home inspection my x sister in law has my children I still don't even have unsupervised when I have been clean for over 4 months my x sister wants to keep the lids for good n has my case working with her I just discovered n have proof that at one of my hearing dcs case worker stated in court to the judge that a screen was dirty which caused me not to have unsupervised this was at the beginning two weeks after my initial screen I thought the weed could have still been in my system was upset because they were suppose to check levels n see if it was going down since this was only a few weeks after initial instead they said dirty I recently requested all of my screens from redwood because I take prescriptions that will show up n I was having my doctor look at levels to verify that matched what I was prescripted because dcs case worker accused me of abuseing when I got my screens I found out that screen I took that dcs case worker stated in court to judge that caused me to not get granted unsupervised was actually negative what can I do about this this is a serious issue saying a parent failed a screen in court to judge when they didn't please advise

  2. I have a degree at law, recent MS in regulatory studies. Licensed in KS, admitted b4 S& 7th circuit, but not to Indiana bar due to political correctness. Blacklisted, nearly unemployable due to hostile state action. Big Idea: Headwinds can overcome, esp for those not within the contours of the bell curve, the Lego Movie happiness set forth above. That said, even without the blacklisting for holding ideas unacceptable to the Glorious State, I think the idea presented above that a law degree open many vistas other than being a galley slave to elitist lawyers is pretty much laughable. (Did the law professors of Indiana pay for this to be published?)

  3. Paul Hartman of Burbank, Oh who is helping Sister Fuller with this Con Artist Kevin Bart McCarthy scares Sister Joseph Therese, Patricia Ann Fuller very much that McCarthy will try and hurt Patricia Ann Fuller and Paul Hartman of Burbank, Oh or any member of his family. Sister is very, very scared, (YES, I AM) This McCarthy guy is a real, real CON MAN and crook. I try to totall flatter Kevin Bart McCARTHY to keep him from hurting my best friends in this world which are Carolyn Rose and Paul Hartman. I Live in total fear of this man Kevin Bart McCarthy and try to praise him as a good man to keep us ALL from his bad deeds. This man could easy have some one cause us a very bad disability. You have to PRAISAE in order TO PROTECT yourself. He lies and makes up stories about people and then tries to steal if THEY OWN THRU THE COURTS A SPECIAL DEVOTION TO PROTECT, EX> Our Lady of America DEVOTION. EVERYONE who reads this, PLEASE BE CAREFUL of Kevin Bart McCarthy of Indianapolis, IN My Phone No. IS 419-435-3838.

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  5. I had a hospital and dcs caseworker falsify reports that my child was born with drugs in her system. I filed a complaint with the Indiana department of health....and they found that the hospital falsified drug screens in their investigation. Then I filed a complaint with human health services in Washington DC...dcs drug Testing is unregulated and is indicating false positives...they are currently being investigated by human health services. Then I located an attorney and signed contracts one month ago to sue dcs and Anderson community hospital. Once the suit is filed I am taking out a loan against the suit and paying a law firm to file a writ of mandamus challenging the courts jurisdiction to invoke chins case against me. I also forwarded evidence to a u.s. senator who contacted hhs to push an investigation faster. Once the lawsuit is filed local news stations will be running coverage on the situation. Easy day....people will be losing their jobs soon...and judge pancol...who has attempted to cover up what has happened will also be in trouble. The drug testing is a kids for cash and federal funding situation.