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Prominent family law attorney dies

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A well-known and longtime family law attorney in Indianapolis died July 7 at the age of 80.

James A. Buck ran a prominent family law practice in Indianapolis, where he successfully tried a number of precedent-setting cases. Buck was also the expert handicapper in the trial to determine whether pari-mutuel betting on horse races was “sport” or “gambling.”

Darryn L. Duchon, a family law attorney who’s worked with Buck since 1987, said the family law community and the general legal community will miss him.

“Jim had a really good personality in that he could talk to the courts and had a presence about himself that made him a great litigator,” Duchon said. “He had a balance between being funny and serious and being effective, and it made him a great attorney.”

Duchon said Buck was working part-time and came into the office a few weeks ago while Duchon was on vacation. He said Buck was walking his dog and lost consciousness and medical workers were unable to revive him.

Besides his family law practice, Buck served as chairman of family law for Indiana Continuing Legal Education Forum, commissioner for Marion County Probate Court, counsel and legal deputy for the Marion County Sheriff and many other positions. Outside of the legal world, he was the “Coin Columnist” for the Indianapolis Star newspaper for 25 years and loved sharing stories and jokes with people he and his dog, Barney, met during their many walks.

He earned his law degree from Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis in 1959 and his undergraduate degree from Butler University in 1951. He served his country as a captain and paratrooper in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, earning a Bronze Star.

He is survived by his wife Jeri, daughter Cheryl (Ken) Carpenter; son Jeff (Greta) Buck; and several grandchildren. Visitation is today from 4 to 8 p.m. at Flanner Buchanan Funeral Center in Broad Ripple. Funeral services will be held there at 10 a.m. Tuesday. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to American Diabetes Association.
 

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  1. Being on this journey from the beginning has convinced me the justice system really doesn't care about the welfare of the child. The trial court judge knew the child belonged with the mother. The father having total disregard for the rules of the court. Not only did this cost the mother and child valuable time together but thousands in legal fees. When the child was with the father the mother paid her child support. When the child was finally with the right parent somehow the father got away without having to pay one penny of child support. He had to be in control. Since he withheld all information regarding the child's welfare he put her in harms way. Mother took the child to the doctor when she got sick and was totally embarrassed she knew nothing regarding the medical information especially the allergies, The mother texted the father (from the doctors office) and he replied call his attorney. To me this doesn't seem like a concerned father. Seeing the child upset when she had to go back to the father. What upset me the most was finding out the child sleeps with him. Sometimes in the nude. Maybe I don't understand all the rules of the law but I thought this was also morally wrong. A concerned parent would allow the child to finish the school year. Say goodbye to her friends. It saddens me to know the child will not have contact with the sisters, aunts, uncles and the 87 year old grandfather. He didn't allow it before. Only the mother is allowed to talk to the child. I don't think now will be any different. I hope the decision the courts made would've been the same one if this was a member of their family. Someday this child will end up in therapy if allowed to remain with the father.

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  4. Sam Bradbury was never a resident of Lafayette he lived in rural Tippecanoe County, Thats an error.

  5. Sam Bradbury was never a resident of Lafayette he lived in rural Tippecanoe County, Thats an error.

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