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Prosecutor candidate indicted for child porn, false informing

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Attorney and Democratic candidate for Gibson County Prosecutor William R. Wallace III was indicted Tuesday on charges of obstruction of justice, possession of child pornography, patronizing a prostitute, and false informing.

In March, a former client and employee of Wallace’s went to the Gibson County Prosecutor’s Office to file a complaint that she learned he had videotaped the two of them having sex without her permission, said special prosecutor Jonathan Parkhurst. Wallace had recently invited the woman’s boyfriend over to his house and shown him a tape of the two having sex. Wallace later denied having the tape or showing it to her boyfriend.

An Indiana State Police investigation revealed that Wallace met his client in fall 2009 when she was in jail and offered to represent her in a civil case out of Vanderburgh County. The woman’s mother paid Wallace $200 dollars, but the total bill was $750. Instead of paying the remainder of the bill, the woman claimed Wallace said he would write off the money owed if she had sex with him.

The two met the night she was released at Wallace’s friend’s apartment and had sex, Parkhurst said.

When police arrived to execute a search warrant of Wallace’s house, Wallace denied having sex with her or that there was any video of it. A detective also caught Wallace in his garage with DVDs, CDs, and an external hard drive stuffed down his pants. Police also searched the apartment where the two had sex.

While searching the computers, the detective discovered what could be child pornography, so a separate search warrant was executed and police found at least two pornographic videos involving young children.

The grand jury met Tuesday and returned four indictments just after 5 p.m. – obstruction of justice as a Class D felony; possession of child pornography as a Class D felony; patronizing a prostitute as a Class A misdemeanor; and false informing as a Class B misdemeanor.

Wallace turned himself in late Tuesday after being advised by Gibson Superior Judge Earl G. Penrod to do so at the sheriff’s department. Wallace posted a $500 cash bond Tuesday night. Wallace’s initial hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. July 2.

According to Wallace’s election website, he worked as Princeton City Attorney from 1993 to 2000 and also worked in private practice and as director of the Homeless Project for Indiana Legal Services in Evansville. He is currently deputy public defender in Vanderburgh Superior Court and Democratic nominee for Gibson County Prosecutor. He was admitted to the bar in 1991, according to the Indiana Roll of Attorneys, and has no prior disciplinary actions.
 

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  3. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

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