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Prosecutor denies alleged misconduct

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Indiana Lawyer Rehearing

Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi denies that he violated any professional conduct rules in his handling of two high-profile murder cases, specifically in his written or spoken statements made when describing the crimes to the public.

On Jan. 11, just three days before the elected prosecutor announced he won’t seek a third term, Brizzi filed an answer to disciplinary charges lodged against him late last year by the Indiana Supreme Court’s Disciplinary Commission.

In its formal complaint against Brizzi filed Oct. 1, the commission alleges that public comments the prosecutor made about two murder cases crossed the line and violated the attorney conduct rules. Brizzi’s statements went beyond the public information purpose and prejudiced the pair of cases, according to the complaint, and amounted to violations of Indiana Professional Conduct Rules 3.8(f) and Rule 3.6(a).

"The above public statements of the Respondent ... were not necessary to inform the public of the nature and extent of the prosecutor's action and did not serve a legitimate law enforcement purpose, and the same were extrajudicial comments that had a substantial likelihood of heightening public condemnation..." the complaint said.

Responding to the complaint, Brizzi admitted the general information about the underlying cases the statements were made about, but declined to admit or deny the specific claims cited in the complaint because the documents they were reportedly taken from were not included as part of the verified complaint.

In the seven-page answer, Brizzi's attorney Kevin McGoff of Bingham McHale in Indianapolis offered one legal defense for his client: "A lawyer is permitted to make an extrajudicial statement, as contemplated by Ind. Prof. Cond.R. 3.6(b), including but not limited to: (2) information contained in a public record and; (3) an investigation is in progress."

The Disciplinary Commission is now able to file a response to Brizzi's answer, and once that happens the Indiana Supreme Court can appoint a hearing officer to examine the evidence. Justices have final say over attorney disciplinary issues, and if it finds any misconduct the penalties could range from a private reprimand to a suspension or disbarment.

Admitted to practice in 1994, Brizzi was first elected prosecutor in 2002 and was reelected in 2006. This is the first time Brizzi has faced any professional misconduct charges, according to his office. But whatever happens with this disciplinary action, it won't impact whether he remains prosecutor of the state's largest county past 2010 - Brizzi announced Jan. 14 he wouldn't seek a third term in November's election. He hasn't announced what his plans are for the future.

Original story "Misconduct charges lodged against prosecutor" IL Oct. 14-27, 2009

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