ILNews

Pyle takes oath at robing ceremony

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Indiana’s newest Court of Appeals judge also holds the distinction of being the only official appointed twice by Gov. Mitch Daniels.

Daniels said it was three years ago Tuesday that he appointed Rudolph Pyle III to the vacancy in Madison Circuit Court. Daniels, an avid biker, joked during Pyle’s robing ceremony that his subsequent appointment of Pyle to the appellate bench had nothing to do with the judge’s past as a motorcycle instructor.

“In a close one it would have been a tie-breaker,” Daniels said. “This wasn’t a close one.”

Pyle choked back tears as he thanked his parents, Rudolph and Caroline Pyle, who performed the ceremonial robing Oct. 16. “My parents gave me the foundation for success through love, discipline and excellence,” he said.

Pyle also praised his mentor – the man he succeeded, COA Senior Judge Carr Darden – for whom Pyle was a law clerk while a student at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Darden, he said, taught him not only what it was to be a good judge, but to be a good attorney.

Darden said it’s no surprise people recognize Pyle as a young, smart, rising jurist.

“You see, I’ve been doing that for a long time,” he said.

Pyle is believed to be the first Indiana appellate judge who also clerked for the appellate bench, COA spokesman Martin DeAgostino said.

Pyle also is the first appellate judge who was an Indiana Conference for Legal Education Opportunity fellow. He also is the first appellate judge who formerly served as an Indiana State Police trooper.

COA Chief Judge Margret Robb said a cursory glance at Pyle’s resume, which also includes work as a deputy prosecutor, proves humbling. “You have a clear picture of the gifts Judge Pyle brings to the court,” she said.

But all those accomplishments, she said, “are nowhere near as important as what Judge Pyle will do in the future.”

Pyle also noted that the occasion allowed men, women and people of all races and creeds to join together in the chambers of the Indiana Supreme Court. “There are folks in this room who remember a time when that was not so,” he said.

 

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  1. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  2. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  3. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  4. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

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