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Quality of Life: Techniques to help kick the worry habit

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Quality of LifeAt the 1989 Grammy Awards ceremony, the song of the year designation was bestowed upon Bobby McFerrin for his song, “Don’t Worry, Be Happy.” Twenty years later, the background music for one of the most popular television commercials on the air was a song called “Trouble,” by Ray LaMontagne – the lyrics of which include the following: “Worry – worry, worry, worry, worry – worry just will not seem to leave my mind alone.” (You know the commercial. It was for Traveler’s Insurance, and it featured a dog attempting to figure out how to safeguard his prized rawhide bone.)

Call it a sign of the times. If it is possible to find a social barometer based upon what resonated with people two decades ago, as compared to what does now, I think it is safe to assume that we live in a worried society. If you look at the state of the economy and the housing market, not to mention what appears to be an increase in natural disasters around the world, it is easy to see why people might be more worried than they were in the late 1980s.

As attorneys, you could be more susceptible to worry than most, given that not only do you have your own issues to consider, you take on the problems of others as a means of earning your livelihood. You worry for a living. You have been trained to identify the possible pitfalls in any given situation. Before I went to law school, I used to be able to look at construction sites or highway repair crews without a second thought. Now I see nothing but potential injuries and accidents waiting to happen.

In and of itself, worry is not necessarily a bad thing. If a small amount of worry is used as the impetus to make sure that we stay prepared and on top of things, then it serves as a good motivator. It is when worry becomes chronic that problems can arise. Sometimes, and I am definitely guilty of this, people think that if they do enough worrying, they can keep something terrible from happening – as though worry creates a force field of protection against bad stuff. Well, I can tell you from experience, that doesn’t work. Bad stuff happens anyway. And as hard as it may be to believe – if the bad thing doesn’t happen, it isn’t because you spent all night worrying about it. Really.

What excessive worry can do, however, is make you sick. Chronic worry can cause an elevation in stress hormones, such as cortisol. This can, in turn, raise your blood sugar and triglyceride levels. Over the long haul, chronic worry can lead to symptoms of anxiety, including rapid heartbeat, fatigue, headaches, inability to concentrate, insomnia, irritability and muscle tension, among others. Eventually, it can set the stage for even more serious health problems.

For many, many people, worry can become a habit. That habit can lead to the litany of problems listed above. The good news is – you can break that habit. If worry is truly impeding your ability to live a happy and productive life, try visiting a counselor, therapist, or spiritual advisor. Sometimes you might need professional help to kick the worry habit.

If you choose to go it alone, consider these three effective methods to use to counteract the worry cycle. The first is to try the “worry time” method. To do this, set aside a half hour during the day and write down everything that is worrying you. Spend 30 straight minutes focusing only on your worries. Think about the worries and all of the potential negative outcomes and/or possible solutions related to them. Wallow in it. At the end of 30 minutes, stop. That’s all the time you are going to give to your worries for the day. If a worry creeps into your consciousness, push the thought away. Your worry time for the day is over. Keep it over. Don’t go back to it until your 30-minute allotted time the following day.

The second method is a good one to use if your worry results in insomnia. Before going to bed, write down everything that is worrying you and place the list on your bedside stand or somewhere near the bed. Your worries are all there. They will be safe all night. You don’t have to risk forgetting them overnight, because they will be waiting patiently at your side, ready to greet you in the morning. This should help you to get a more restful sleep. Getting more rest is useful in breaking the worry cycle, as many times worry is born of exhaustion. (You can even use your nighttime worry list as the basis for your 30-minute worryfest the next day – for complete worry efficiency! Believe me, it’s been done.)

The third method (which is helpful used in conjunction with the other two) is the exercise method. Walking, running, or other aerobic workouts are good for this method because exercise helps to dissipate negative energy created by worry. (It also can elicit an endorphin rush, which helps mental attitude as well!) For the first 15 minutes of your walk or run, allow yourself to worry about whatever is plaguing you that day. Then, for the next 15 minutes, put the “worry thoughts” out of your mind. Think about something fun, something good that happened during the day, or something you are looking forward to doing in the future. Envision placing the worry thoughts in a box and setting them aside for the rest of your run. The end of your run or walk is purely for positive thoughts.

While it may not be as simple as just saying “don’t worry, be happy,” if you try these methods, you can be on the road to banishing worry from your life.•

__________

Jonna Kane MacDougall, an Indianapolis attorney, is assistant dean for external affairs and alumni relations at the Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis and a former law school career services director. A professional career/life coach, MacDougall can be contacted at 317-370-4361 or via email at whatsnextforyou@comcast.net. The opinions expressed in this column are the author’s.

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  1. No second amendment, pro life, pro traditional marriage, reagan or trump tshirts will be sold either. And you cannot draw Mohammed even in your own notebook. And you must wear a helmet at all times while at the fair. And no lawyer jokes can be told except in the designated protest area. And next year no crucifixes, since they are uber offensive to all but Catholics. Have a nice bland day here in the Lego movie. Remember ... Everything is awesome comrades.

  2. Thank you for this post . I just bought a LG External DVD It came with Cyber pwr 2 go . It would not play on Lenovo Idea pad w/8.1 . Your recommended free VLC worked great .

  3. All these sites putting up all the crap they do making Brent Look like A Monster like he's not a good person . First off th fight actually started not because of Brent but because of one of his friends then when the fight popped off his friend ran like a coward which left Brent to fend for himself .It IS NOT a crime to defend yourself 3 of them and 1 of him . just so happened he was a better fighter. I'm Brent s wife so I know him personally and up close . He's a very caring kind loving man . He's not abusive in any way . He is a loving father and really shouldn't be where he is not for self defense . Now because of one of his stupid friends trying to show off and turning out to be nothing but a coward and leaving Brent to be jumped by 3 men not only is Brent suffering but Me his wife , his kids abd step kidshis mom and brother his family is left to live without him abd suffering in more ways then one . that man was and still is my smile ....he's the one real thing I've ever had in my life .....f@#@ You Lafayette court system . Learn to do your jobs right he maybe should have gotten that year for misdemeanor battery but that s it . not one person can stand to me and tell me if u we're in a fight facing 3 men and u just by yourself u wouldn't fight back that you wouldn't do everything u could to walk away to ur family ur kids That's what Brent is guilty of trying to defend himself against 3 men he wanted to go home tohisfamily worse then they did he just happened to be a better fighter and he got the best of th others . what would you do ? Stand there lay there and be stomped and beaten or would u give it everything u got and fight back ? I'd of done the same only I'm so smallid of probably shot or stabbed or picked up something to use as a weapon . if it was me or them I'd do everything I could to make sure I was going to live that I would make it hone to see my kids and husband . I Love You Brent Anthony Forever & Always .....Soul 1 baby

  4. Good points, although this man did have a dog in the legal fight as that it was his mother on trial ... and he a dependent. As for parking spaces, handicap spots for pregnant women sure makes sense to me ... er, I mean pregnant men or women. (Please, I meant to include pregnant men the first time, not Room 101 again, please not Room 101 again. I love BB)

  5. I have no doubt that the ADA and related laws provide that many disabilities must be addressed. The question, however, is "by whom?" Many people get dealt bad cards by life. Some are deaf. Some are blind. Some are crippled. Why is it the business of the state to "collectivize" these problems and to force those who are NOT so afflicted to pay for those who are? The fact that this litigant was a mere spectator and not a party is chilling. What happens when somebody who speaks only East Bazurkistanish wants a translator so that he can "understand" the proceedings in a case in which he has NO interest? Do I and all other taxpayers have to cough up? It would seem so. ADA should be amended to provide a simple rule: "Your handicap, YOUR problem". This would apply particularly to handicapped parking spaces, where it seems that if the "handicap" is an ingrown toenail, the government comes rushing in to assist the poor downtrodden victim. I would grant wounded vets (IED victims come to mind in particular) a pass on this.. but others? Nope.

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