ILNews

Schedule set to fill upcoming Indiana Supreme Court vacancy

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Anyone who wants to be the next Indiana Supreme Court justice has until the end of June to apply for upcoming vacancy on the state’s highest court.

The Indiana Supreme Court’s Judicial Nominating Commission is accepting applications until June 30 for the appellate post, which is being vacated once Justice Theodore Boehm retires Sept. 30. He announced his decision May 25.

In the initial days after his announcement, the Indiana legal community has already started speculating who could be the next state justice, and much discussion has focused on whether that person should come from the judiciary and how likely it is that a woman would be named.

Indiana and Idaho are currently the only two states without a female justice, while Justice Boehm is one of three sitting justices who don’t have any judicial experience before joining Indiana’s high court.

Though there are names being batted about and formulas for who might be the state’s 106th justice, one common theme is clear: that person will have much to live up to in succeeding Justice Boehm.

“Those are large shoes to fill,” said Indianapolis attorney Jason Stephenson at Barnes & Thornburg, one of two authors of an annual review of the state’s high court. “His replacement needs to be ready to draft a lot of opinions, (because) over the years that I’ve participated in this article Justice Boehm has often written the majority of the court’s opinions.”

With the polarization between the federal and state governments, Stephenson said the appointee will have to be able to listen to both sides as Justice Boehm has done and not exhibit a knee-jerk reaction. This is even more crucial in the current political climate so that the end result is viewed as clearly just and not politically driven.

Many key players in the legal community say the next justice should be a woman, but they’re quick to note that gender is just one consideration and any appointee must be qualified for the post. Justice Boehm is one of those voices, as are Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard and former Justice Myra Selby, who was the state’s first and only female member of the court in the mid ’90s.

“I think it’s definitely something he should – and I expect will – take into consideration,” Justice Boehm said about the governor’s option in name a female justice. “It may not be the controlling factor, but it certainly should be something that is in everybody’s thoughts.”

Any court must reflect all kinds of diversity, from gender and race to geography, backgrounds, and skill sets, Justice Boehm said. In order to increase the court’s diversity on all those fronts, the retiring justice said this could be a time to again think about expanding the court from five members to as many as eight, as the state Constitution allows. The topic first surfaced in the late 1980s and again the late ’90s, but it hasn’t come up seriously since then. He won’t be the one to raise it but said it might be a concept for the legislature to start considering.

“It wouldn’t be a bad idea,” Justice Boehm said.

Indianapolis attorney and Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis professor Joel Schumm, who clerked for Justice Boehm in the late ’90s, said he hopes the new justice is a woman – particularly because half of all attorneys graduating law school are females and the court doesn’t reflect that trend.

Indiana Court of Appeals Judge Margret Robb, one of five women on the intermediate appellate bench, said it’s an important issue.

“In terms of women on the court, that is an important consideration, but my overall hope is that the person will have requisite respect for the other branches of government, the law, and the Constitution,” said Judge Robb, who’s been a board member for the National Association of Women’s Judges.

Selby has echoed those thoughts, telling Indiana Lawyer in the past that the high court should reflect society and that having a female perspective is important and warrants discussion along with all the factors.

When Selby left the court, the legal community clamored for another female justice and then called for an expansion after Justice Robert Rucker was elevated from the Court of Appeals to take her spot. At the time, Chief Justice Shepard predicted that the next justice would be a woman – though he didn’t know at what point in the future that might happen.

The time could be now.

But ultimately, that depends on who applies, who the seven-member Judicial Nominating Commission chooses as finalists, and which person Gov. Mitch Daniels picks for the court.

Most of the process is in the hands of the nominating commission, which the chief justice chairs and consists of three attorneys chosen by their colleagues and three non-lawyers appointed by the governor.

Commission members will conduct public interviews with applicants July 6 and 7 in Indianapolis, and then a second round of interviews with semi-finalists will take place July 30. The commission will deliberate in executive session following those second interviews and then vote in a public session on the names of the three finalists that will be forwarded to Gov. Daniels for consideration.

Though Gov. Daniels has appointed two judges in recent years to the Indiana Court of Appeals, this will be his first chance to name a Supreme Court justice and it’s the first time since 1986 that a Republican governor will have the chance to fill a post on that bench.

By law, the governor has 60 days to select a new justice from the time he receives the nomination list. If he fails to do so, the chief justice or acting chief justice would make the appointment from the same list.

A candidate must be an Indiana resident and an Indiana bar member for at least 10 years, or an Indiana judge for at least five years. The annual salary and allowances for a Supreme Court justice is $154,328, according to the court’s public information officer Kathryn Dolan.

Whoever is chosen will serve until he or she faces a retention vote in the next general election at least two years following their appointment, then it would be every 10 years following that. Appellate judges in Indiana are only allowed to serve on the bench until the mandatory retirement age of 75, which was one of the reasons why Justice Boehm – who turns 72 in September – decided to retire now.

The last time a new justice search happened because of Selby’s return to private practice in 1999, the commission received 25 applications – significantly more than the 10 who’d applied in 1994 when she was eventually chosen by then-Gov. Evan Bayh.

Those interested in applying may contact counsel Adrienne Meiring with the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission at (317) 232-4706. Applications are posted on the state judiciary’s website at http://www.in.gov/judiciary/jud-qual/justice.html.

As far as planning for a Supreme Court seat, Justice Boehm said it mostly comes down to someone being in the right place at the right time – as he said he was.

“It’s about who fits the makeup of the court, is someone the commission wants, the governor wants … what are the odds of being in the right place?” he said. “As far as planning … I’m not sure there’s a way to. If your career plan is to be an appellate judge, then your financial plan should be to win the lottery.”•

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. What is the one thing the Hoosier legal status quo hates more than a whistleblower? A lawyer whistleblower taking on the system man to man. That must never be rewarded, must always, always, always be punished, lest the whole rotten tree be felled.

  2. I want to post this to keep this tread alive and hope more of David's former clients might come forward. In my case, this coward of a man represented me from June 2014 for a couple of months before I fired him. I knew something was wrong when he blatantly lied about what he had advised me in my contentious and unfortunate divorce trial. His impact on the proceedings cast a very long shadow and continues to impact me after a lengthy 19 month divorce. I would join a class action suit.

  3. The dispute in LB Indiana regarding lake front property rights is typical of most beach communities along our Great Lakes. Simply put, communication to non owners when visiting the lakefront would be beneficial. The Great Lakes are designated navigational waters (including shorelines). The high-water mark signifies the area one is able to navigate. This means you can walk, run, skip, etc. along the shores. You can't however loiter, camp, sunbath in front of someones property. Informational signs may be helpful to owners and visitors. Our Great Lakes are a treasure that should be enjoyed by all. PS We should all be concerned that the Long Beach, Indiana community is on septic systems.

  4. Dear Fan, let me help you correct the title to your post. "ACLU is [Left] most of the time" will render it accurate. Just google it if you doubt that I am, err, "right" about this: "By the mid-1930s, Roger Nash Baldwin had carved out a well-established reputation as America’s foremost civil libertarian. He was, at the same time, one of the nation’s leading figures in left-of-center circles. Founder and long time director of the American Civil Liberties Union, Baldwin was a firm Popular Fronter who believed that forces on the left side of the political spectrum should unite to ward off the threat posed by right-wing aggressors and to advance progressive causes. Baldwin’s expansive civil liberties perspective, coupled with his determined belief in the need for sweeping socioeconomic change, sometimes resulted in contradictory and controversial pronouncements. That made him something of a lightning rod for those who painted the ACLU with a red brush." http://www.harvardsquarelibrary.org/biographies/roger-baldwin-2/ "[George Soros underwrites the ACLU' which It supports open borders, has rushed to the defense of suspected terrorists and their abettors, and appointed former New Left terrorist Bernardine Dohrn to its Advisory Board." http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=1237 "The creation of non-profit law firms ushered in an era of progressive public interest firms modeled after already established like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ("NAACP") and the American Civil Liberties Union ("ACLU") to advance progressive causes from the environmental protection to consumer advocacy." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cause_lawyering

  5. Mr. Foltz: Your comment that the ACLU is "one of the most wicked and evil organizations in existence today" clearly shows you have no real understanding of what the ACLU does for Americans. The fact that the state is paying out so much in legal fees to the ACLU is clear evidence the ACLU is doing something right, defending all of us from laws that are unconstitutional. The ACLU is the single largest advocacy group for the US Constitution. Every single citizen of the United States owes some level of debt to the ACLU for defending our rights.

ADVERTISEMENT