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Services Sunday for longtime litigator Edgar Bayliff

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Attorney Edgar Bayliff, former president of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association, died Jan. 4. He was 84.

Bayliff was admitted to practice in Indiana in 1954 and had been a member of the Kokomo firm Bayliff Harrigan Cord and Maugans for nearly 40 years. Beginning in the early 1970s, Bayliff helped lead a team of ITLA attorneys that lobbied against the passage of no-fault legislation. Because of those efforts, Indiana’s Comparative Fault Act was passed in 1983, resulting in sweeping changes to how juries award damages in Indiana. Micki Wilson, ITLA executive director, said, “Ed didn’t just practice law, he made law.”

In 1966, Bayliff served as president of ITLA.  Later in his career, the association honored him with the Trial Lawyer of the Year award and Lifetime Achievement Award. The ITLA also recognized him with the Hoosier Freedom Award; other recipients of that award have included the late Gov. Frank O’Bannon, Sen. Richard Lugar and Indiana Supreme Court Justice Randall Shepard. For many years, Bayliff served on the Board of Governors for the American Trial Lawyers Association. And in 1990, he received a Distinguished Service Award from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, his alma mater.

Bayliff was a United States Army veteran of World War II and the Korean War and was a member of Main Street United Methodist Church in Kokomo for more than 50 years.

He is survived by wife Betty Lou (Whitman) Bayliff; son Brad (Lisa) Bayliff of Austin, Texas; daughter Dixie (Jeff) McKean of Indianapolis; grandchildren Corby and Carly McKean and several nieces and nephews.

Visitation is 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday at Shirley and Stout Funeral Home, 1315 W. Lincoln Road, Kokomo, with a memorial service at 6 p.m.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Indiana or Main Street United Methodist Church, Kokomo.
 

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  1. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  2. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  3. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  4. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  5. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

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