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Sidebars: Find a little Mardi Gras any time at The Bar

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SidebarsWhen I think of culinary capitals in the United States, New Orleans is right at the top of that list. We have recently been blessed by the arrival of chef John Maxwell who worked for years at New Orleans’ Mother’s and Antoine’s restaurants. John is now at The Bar, located on the corner of 9th and Pennsylvania streets at the base of the Ambassador Hotel Apartments in downtown Indianapolis. He is developing a menu that will certainly please those who appreciate Cajun cooking.

Fred and I were joined at The Bar by two fellow counselors, Alex Will and James Bell, of Indy’s corporation counsel and Bingham McHale respectively. The underlying purpose of the meeting was to discuss bar association business and thus what a better place to do so than The Bar. We accomplished the bar business but we also succeeded at producing lots of laughs at and with each other. For example, advising James about buying a new smart phone while he diligently worked, with his face about 1 inch from the table, to get the rollerball thingy back in the face of his Blackberry, circa 2002, was really funny but also slightly painful. Anyway, to the food!

The Bar is technically “a bar” but does not feel pub-like or sports-bar like. The décor of the entire place is refined enough that the actual bar does not dominate the scenery despite its largeness. Our waiter immediately notified us that the kitchen prides itself with fresh cooking and thus we should not be in a huge rush. The meals actually came out in due course, with the exception of one appetizer that showed a bit late, but we were still at lunch for an hour. He explained the specials included an oyster po-boy, beef vegetable soup, and horseradish encrusted salmon. The salmon will soon be a permanent addition to the menu. He directed us to the placard on the table where we found additional appetizer specials. We immediately put in an order for the alligator balls and then added an order of the pepper butter shrimp with blue cheese for the table. The alligator balls came out promptly and were atop a Creole honey mustard sauce that had a small kick to it. The moist alligator was shelled in crispy breading that was quite flavorful.

Next were the entrees, and we were all very satisfied except for Fred, whose French dip was pretty blah. No worries though, I have learned the French dip will soon be replaced by a more succulent pot roast sandwich and promises to be much richer and satisfying. Alex cleaned his plate of a huge oyster po-boy sandwich. The perfect amount of spiced breading and hot sauce did not override the oysters but made for a perfect combination of all the flavors. Apparently the chef uses only peanut oil and ensures his seafood is cold at the time of preparation to enhance all the flavors. James, after he had fixed his Wang-generation phone, dug into the red beans and rice with the hot sausage. The sausage accompanies the red beans and rice on the side and is presumably cooked separately from the red beans and rice. James did not eat all the sausage but left hardly any of the red beans and rice which is an endorsement for the dish. Finally, I had the fried shrimp sandwich and fries. The coating on the shrimp obviously contains spiced corn meal, which I discovered was a Zataran’s batter, and thus complements the shrimp rather than enveloping it. I don’t think I’d get the sandwich again but rather just the fried shrimp, which is also an entree. The fries are thin-sliced and also cooked in the peanut oil and delicious.

During our meal one of the best items arrived – the pepper butter shrimp with blue cheese. A very spicy sauce with just a touch of breading on the shrimp and crumbled blue cheese distracted Fred from his blah French dip sandwich. The sauce was like a buffalo sauce but much richer due to the butter. This was no corporate buffalo sauce is all I’m saying. We all were impressed by this dish and the kitchen was forgiven for its tardiness.

Wouldn’t a big ol’ plate of jambalaya temporarily cure those winter blues? Grab a colleague, friend, opposing counsel, or anyone and entertain your taste buds with a little Mardi Gras for your mouth at The Bar.•

__________


Fred Vaiana and Jennifer M. Lukemeyer practice at Voyles Zahn Paul Hogan & Merriman in Indianapolis, focusing in criminal defense. Vaiana is a 1992 graduate of the John Marshall Law School in Chicago. Lukemeyer earned her J.D. from Southern Methodist University in 1994 and is active in the Indianapolis Bar Association, Indianapolis Inn of Courts, and the Teen Court Program. The opinions expressed in this column are the authors’.

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  1. Indianapolis employers harassment among minorities AFRICAN Americans needs to be discussed the metro Indianapolis area is horrible when it comes to harassing African American employees especially in the local healthcare facilities. Racially profiling in the workplace is an major issue. Please make it better because I'm many civil rights leaders would come here and justify that Indiana is a state the WORKS only applies to Caucasian Americans especially in Hamilton county. Indiana targets African Americans in the workplace so when governor pence is trying to convince people to vote for him this would be awesome publicity for the Presidency Elections.

  2. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  3. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  4. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  5. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

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