ILNews

Sidebars: Tavern on South gains favorable ruling

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

SidebarsI frequented Tavern on South twice for this exercise and both times I was not disappointed. The first trip I was accompanied by the Hon. Heather Welch and my colleague Jim Voyles, and the second trip by Bob Hill, Marion County’s chief public defender. Going twice provided an opportunity to diversify my review and check the consistency of its offerings.

Practically next door to Lucas Oil Stadium on South Street (go figure), this warehouse has been transformed to a really cool joint. Modern but comfortable and not too “tavernish,” it is very accessible because of its large parking lot immediately east of the building. On game days, it may not be as accessible by car, but I’m sure the foot traffic will provide the owners with record days.

On my first trip, Jim ordered a side Tuscan salad (really a Greek salad) which impressed him as being fresh, not drowning in dressing, and the perfect size. He indulged in a tavern crispy pepperoni pizza which is on wheat thin crust. Jim, the traditionalist, got scared of some of the bread offerings on the sandwich list because no sandwich was offered on Wonder Bread or Sunbeam Wheat. His fear guided him well with his pizza. The pizza offerings also include a Red (red sauce, red pepper, mozzarella, parmesan and fresh basil), White (béchamel, mozzarella, parmesan and white cheddar) and the Black & Blue (barbeque sauce, Cajun beef tenderloin, mozzarella and blue cheese). Heather polished off her Circle City Club of grilled chicken, Mariah’s Indiana peppered bacon, goat cheese, and pesto tomato, served on grilled ciabatta. (Heather, being the good, open-minded Democrat she is, did not shy away from the non-traditional bread choices.) She ruled in favor of the sandwich by cleaning her plate. I could not resist the Tavern Tenderloin Sliders served with mustard aioli and lettuce on pretzel rolls. Those little suckers were as good as the larger versions! I opted for the herb dusted French fries, but the homemade kettle chips are the way to go.

Overall, service and food-wise, they were about knock-it-out-of-the-park until we (well, “we” being Jim) ordered a simple dessert of ice cream and some chocolate sauce. We waited and waited and waited until we could wait no more. The place got busy and we were forgotten so we asked for our check as Jim wiped that lone tear drop from his cheek.

On the second visit, Bob and I split the crab ravioli which was bland and not worth the calories. I wish we would have opted for the crispy Maple Leaf Farms duck wings with your choice of salt and vinegar, garlic buffalo, or shagbark hickory teriyaki. Apparently Bob, like myself, abides by the saying “I did not fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian.” He devoured the Tavern Smoked Bison Burger dressed up with charred tomato barbeque glaze and peppercorn bacon on brioche roll. I daintily ate the Tavern Smoked Prime Rib on grilled ciabatta with onions, smoky natural jus, and horseradish mousse. The “Tavern Smoked” preparation of both sandwiches added great flavor, and I would suggest either. If you are vegetarian they do offer a roasted pepper and grilled Portobello sandwich and some entrée-size salads and the non-meat pizzas, of course. The second visit was consistent with the first so that is a good sign.

Grab a colleague, friend, opposing counsel, mentor/mentee and enjoy sophisticated food in a sophisticated-tavern-type setting. Worthy of 3.5 gavels – if only you had remembered the ice cream and forgotten the crab ravioli!

Tavern on South is located at 423 W. South Street in Indianapolis, Ind. For more details visit: www.tavernonsouth.com.•

Fred Vaiana and Jennifer M. Lukemeyer practice at Voyles Zahn Paul Hogan & Merriman in Indianapolis, focusing in criminal defense. Vaiana is a 1992 graduate of the John Marshall Law School in Chicago. Lukemeyer earned her J.D. from Southern Methodist University in 1994 and is active in the Indianapolis Bar Association, Indianapolis Inn of Courts, and the Teen Court Program. The opinions expressed in this column are the authors’.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. It appears the police and prosecutors are allowed to change the rules halfway through the game to suit themselves. I am surprised that the congress has not yet eliminated the right to a trial in cases involving any type of forensic evidence. That would suit their foolish law and order police state views. I say we eliminate the statute of limitations for crimes committed by members of congress and other government employees. Of course they would never do that. They are all corrupt cowards!!!

  2. Poor Judge Brown probably thought that by slavishly serving the godz of the age her violations of 18th century concepts like due process and the rule of law would be overlooked. Mayhaps she was merely a Judge ahead of her time?

  3. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  4. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

  5. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

ADVERTISEMENT