ILNews

Starting over

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

In January, Jerome Daniels looked forward to getting a fresh start. Newly released from prison, he hoped to find a job so he could provide for his two daughters.

“I was locked up for their whole life,” he said of his daughters, now 16 and 18. “I watched them grow up in the visiting room.”

But during the time Daniels was in prison, he was still liable for child support, which continued to accrue. When he got out, his criminal record made finding work a challenge.

For many ex-offenders, this type of predicament results in a cycle that can land them right back in prison. Without jobs, they can’t pay child support, and they may end up losing their driver’s licenses as a result which, in turn, makes finding work even more difficult.

Attorneys at Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic hope to be able to break that cycle by working with ex-offenders through its Project GRACE, which stands for Guided Re-entry Assistance and Community Education.

Origins and evolution

The foundations of Project GRACE began with the work of Josh Abel, executive director for Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic.

“Josh was initially the one who started doing expungement and pardons and sealing petitions, realizing just how much of a hindrance it was to have some kind of criminal record in trying to get a job, in trying to reintegrate into society,” said Chris Purnell, managing attorney. “It’s really a huge scarlet letter, and it’s hard to find work.”

project grace Mitzi Wilson, Project GRACE staff attorney, has advised Jerome Daniels on civil legal remedies. (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

So Project GRACE – launched late in 2010 – began to focus on how to help ex-offenders begin life anew. Project GRACE staff attorney Mitzi Wilson said many ex-offenders have several civil legal problems that they need help with, including child support, visitation and bankruptcy.

“We’ve been doing expungement for folks for years, but under the old law – prior to July 1 – it was really restrictive. So we were advising hundreds of people a year, ‘Sorry, you can’t do anything. Under current Indiana law, you’re out of luck,’” Abel said.

Year after year, Abel said he and the staff saw bills die in the Legislature that could have helped ex-offenders restrict access to their records, so they didn’t expect anything different to happen in 2011. They were pleasantly surprised when Indiana’s House Bill 1211 passed. Public Law 194 took effect in July.

Josh Abel Mug Abel

Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic was able to hire Wilson full-time in September, due to funding from the Indianapolis Parks Foundation 2011 Community Crime Prevention Grant Program and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.

“It’s really fortuitous that all this was in the works, so when we got the grant funding to bring Mitzi on board, she was really able to hit the ground running,” Abel said.

Latest developments

The new law has opened up more opportunities for ex-offenders to clear their records, Wilson explained.

“For individuals that have certain convictions that are either Class D felony or misdemeanor, and they’re not sex or violent offenders, they can petition for restricted access to that conviction if it’s been eight years since their sentence,” Wilson said. “There is kind of another requirement on top of that – I don’t know how clear that aspect of the law is yet – but if they have a subsequent felony within that timeframe they may or may not be eligible.”

Since July 1, Project GRACE has had one petition to restrict access to criminal records granted. Wilson withdrew one petition because the client had paperwork showing different dates for the completion of his probation. She said that petition will be re-filed in a year.

Wilson is preparing to file 15 petitions, and she said at least five cases are stuck in hearing, as the court keeps continuing the hearings.

chris purnell Purnell

Colleen White, AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer and Project GRACE associate, said because the law is so new, courts and communities are still trying to determine how it applies and what parties are restricted from access when a petition is granted.

She said that the Department of Correction, Office of the Indiana Attorney General, the state police and courts will have to work together to uphold court orders that restrict access.

“There’s a lot of confusion with the new law, and a lot of community confusion, too … so that’s one of the biggest parts, going to all these community meetings and just getting the word out there,” White said. “We’re willing to go out – if there’s an audience of one or 100 people – we’re willing to go out and clear the air.”

Reaching people

While project members can educate ex-offenders about the legal remedies available to them, they hope to be able to reach more people after conviction but before incarceration so they are aware that they can file a petition to modify child support.

“The problem is it’s such a short amount of time and that’s not big on people’s list: I’m going to prison right now, let me modify my child support,” White said. “So, we need to let them know that is available to them.”

colleen white White

The clinic conducts intakes around Indianapolis and also in northeast Indiana in Huntington and Fort Wayne, where its second office is located. Daniels learned about Project GRACE through an intake at an Indianapolis church.

He was able to find a job, but the amount garnished from his check for his younger daughter’s benefit left him struggling to make ends meet and to provide for his older daughter, who is now in college.

“We don’t really connect,” he said of his oldest daughter. “I’ve been gone her whole life, that’s a big part of it. But the other part is, she sees me as a deadbeat. I can’t come and take her to McDonald’s … kids in college, they want things, and I can’t buy her a laptop.”

Wilson has been working on getting Daniels’ garnishment reduced to a more manageable level and helping him with a driver’s license problem.

“I’ve been trying to start from this point on. I made a mistake, and I paid for my mistake through the American legal system, and now all I ask for is a second chance,” Daniels said.

Daniels said he knows that others in his position could benefit from the kind of guidance Project GRACE provides.

“One day we have to come back out here. One day, we’re going to need jobs, and we’re going to need to reintegrate into society,” he said. “It’s a whole group of people who would like a second chance.”•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. State Farm is sad and filled with woe Edward Rust is no longer CEO He had knowledge, but wasn’t in the know The Board said it was time for him to go All American Girl starred Margaret Cho The Miami Heat coach is nicknamed Spo I hate to paddle but don’t like to row Edward Rust is no longer CEO The Board said it was time for him to go The word souffler is French for blow I love the rain but dislike the snow Ten tosses for a nickel or a penny a throw State Farm is sad and filled with woe Edward Rust is no longer CEO Bambi’s mom was a fawn who became a doe You can’t line up if you don’t get in a row My car isn’t running, “Give me a tow” He had knowledge but wasn’t in the know The Board said it was time for him to go Plant a seed and water it to make it grow Phases of the tide are ebb and flow If you head isn’t hairy you don’t have a fro You can buff your bald head to make it glow State Farm is sad and filled with woe Edward Rust is no longer CEO I like Mike Tyson more than Riddick Bowe A mug of coffee is a cup of joe Call me brother, don’t call me bro When I sing scat I sound like Al Jarreau State Farm is sad and filled with woe The Board said it was time for him to go A former Tigers pitcher was Lerrin LaGrow Ursula Andress was a Bond girl in Dr. No Brian Benben is married to Madeline Stowe Betsy Ross couldn’t knit but she sure could sew He had knowledge but wasn’t in the know Edward Rust is no longer CEO Grand Funk toured with David Allan Coe I said to Shoeless Joe, “Say it ain’t so” Brandon Lee died during the filming of The Crow In 1992 I didn’t vote for Ross Perot State Farm is sad and filled with woe The Board said it was time for him to go A hare is fast and a tortoise is slow The overhead compartment is for luggage to stow Beware from above but look out below I’m gaining momentum, I’ve got big mo He had knowledge but wasn’t in the know Edward Rust is no longer CEO I’ve travelled far but have miles to go My insurance company thinks I’m their ho I’m not their friend but I am their foe Robin Hood had arrows, a quiver and a bow State Farm has a lame duck CEO He had knowledge, but wasn’t in the know The Board said it was time for him to go State Farm is sad and filled with woe

  2. The ADA acts as a tax upon all for the benefit of a few. And, most importantly, the many have no individual say in whether they pay the tax. Those with handicaps suffered in military service should get a pass, but those who are handicapped by accident or birth do NOT deserve that pass. The drivel about "equal access" is spurious because the handicapped HAVE equal access, they just can't effectively use it. That is their problem, not society's. The burden to remediate should be that of those who seek the benefit of some social, constructional, or dimensional change, NOT society generally. Everybody wants to socialize the costs and concentrate the benefits of government intrusion so that they benefit and largely avoid the costs. This simply maintains the constant push to the slop trough, and explains, in part, why the nation is 20 trillion dollars in the hole.

  3. Hey 2 psychs is never enough, since it is statistically unlikely that three will ever agree on anything! New study admits this pseudo science is about as scientifically valid as astrology ... done by via fortune cookie ....John Ioannidis, professor of health research and policy at Stanford University, said the study was impressive and that its results had been eagerly awaited by the scientific community. “Sadly, the picture it paints - a 64% failure rate even among papers published in the best journals in the field - is not very nice about the current status of psychological science in general, and for fields like social psychology it is just devastating,” he said. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/aug/27/study-delivers-bleak-verdict-on-validity-of-psychology-experiment-results

  4. Indianapolis Bar Association President John Trimble and I are on the same page, but it is a very large page with plenty of room for others to join us. As my final Res Gestae article will express in more detail in a few days, the Great Recession hastened a fundamental and permanent sea change for the global legal service profession. Every state bar is facing the same existential questions that thrust the medical profession into national healthcare reform debates. The bench, bar, and law schools must comprehensively reconsider how we define the practice of law and what it means to access justice. If the three principals of the legal service profession do not recast the vision of their roles and responsibilities soon, the marketplace will dictate those roles and responsibilities without regard for the public interests that the legal profession professes to serve.

  5. I have met some highly placed bureaucrats who vehemently disagree, Mr. Smith. This is not your father's time in America. Some ideas are just too politically incorrect too allow spoken, says those who watch over us for the good of their concept of order.

ADVERTISEMENT