ILNews

Stories to tell

Jenny Montgomery
February 15, 2012
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Lawyers are familiar with how to construct contracts, estate plans, briefs – the necessary but often uninspiring writing that’s part of the job. Sometimes lawyers seek a more creative outlet, the opportunity to put pen to paper in a more fulfilling way.

Alyce Miller, professor of creative writing and literature at Indiana University, has noticed that in classes and workshops she leads for the public, many of her students are doctors and lawyers. Miller is also a lawyer, and she said that while legal writing and creative writing require different ways of thinking, she sees a strong connection between those two abilities.

“The law itself is all about narrative,” she said.

With planning, peer input and exemplary time management, some attorneys have used their knack for narration to write the kind of books you won’t find in a law library.

The process

Solo attorney Stephen Terrell has worked as a journalist and editor and has written extensively for magazines and legal publications. Recently, he finished his first legal thriller, “Stars Fall,” and published it online.

“The story’s been in my head in various forms for more than 10 years, probably. And at one point in time, I wrote about the first 60 or 70 pages and circulated it to some friends … and got some comments back that were saying things that I knew, which was, it was way overwritten,” he said. “And so, I let it sit for a while and really went back to it I guess a couple of years ago and spent a good part of the summer writing it.”

Terrell knew that if he was going to finish his book, he’d have to make time to write.

For the six to eight months that he was working on all the details, outline, plot and characters, Terrell would visit Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts up to four times a week to get coffee and devote a couple of hours to work on his book. And on the weekends, whenever he had an hour or two to spare, he wrote.

“That’s a really hard thing to do, and maybe that’s why it took me so long to get this done. But I just decided at my age, I wanted to do this, and by God, I was going to do this at least once.”

Marti Starkey, like Terrell, had been pondering an idea for a book for years. But fiction wasn’t her calling. She wanted to write about the role spirituality played in her life.

“I just knew that I needed to do it, but it didn’t ever really seem like the right time,” she said. “And certainly, my life was so full, just being a lawyer and being a mother – it’s a very full life.”

In 2010, Starkey’s father died, and almost immediately after his death, she felt a renewed focus on writing her story. But she told only the people closest to her about her plans, one of whom was her law partner, Lisa Adler.

Adler told Starkey, “Marti, you take two weeks, and you just write.” Starkey didn’t know if it would be possible to put her book together in two weeks or how Adler would be able to juggle the additional work during that time. She quickly figured out that she was most productive in the morning, so she would write each moAuthorChart.jpgrning, working half days in the afternoon.

She hired a driver to take her to a business meeting in Chicago so she could edit her work on the way there and back. And one day, after taking her husband to a doctor’s appointment, she waited for him in the car, working on her book.

“I just made every minute count,” she said.

Motivation

Laurie Gray was a deputy prosecuting attorney for the Allen County Prosecutor’s Office in Fort Wayne for 10 years. During that time, she worked with young people who had been victims of sexual violence and with young perpetrators, too. As a former high school teacher, she understood how to relate to young people, and she sees writing as a way to have a positive influence on the lives of teens.

“Really, literature is such a great way to meet kids where they are … and to just really have a dialog with kids,” she said.

Her book, “Summer Sanctuary,” about a boy who befriends a homeless girl won the Moonbeam Children’s Book Gold Medal award in 2010 in the Young Adult Fiction – Religion/Spirituality category. And her forthcoming book, “Maybe I Will,” is about a teen attempting to overcome a sexual assault.

“You read the whole book from the first-person perspective not knowing whether Sandy is female or male,” Gray said. “The whole point is Sandy is both. Sandy is actually human, and you can read the whole book one way or the other.”

Gray said she doesn’t care if her books make money and that she does plan to continue writing. And Terrell said his goal is simply for people to read his work.

Starkey said she won’t profit from sales of her book; all proceeds are earmarked for overseas missionary organizations. And she’s not sure if she’ll write another book.

“I do not feel compelled to write another book; I’m not saying that I wouldn’t write another book, but this is the only book I’ve felt compelled to write,” Starkey said. “It’s actually been one of the most amazing journeys I’ve ever had. The joy and peace I felt on that Thursday when it was completed, it was just beyond my understanding.”

Learning

Miller said that while age and experience are helpful for aspiring writers, all lawyers are not necessarily outstanding creative writers.

“Legal writing is very different from creative writing, and there are extremely beautiful legal writers, but not all legal writers are beautiful writers,” she said. “I don’t think it’s specific to lawyers, but when you write you have to be a really broad and deep reader.”

Both Miller and Terrell believe workshops may be helpful for lawyers who want to become authors because they offer writers the chance to talk to each other and share ideas.

“I would encourage somebody who’s a closet writer to take the time to go to some writers’ conferences, particularly the Midwest Writers Workshop at Ball State – it’s really close, and it’s not expensive, and it gives you the ability to network with people who share your same interest, Terrell said. “It’s more than just about writing classes, it’s learning – talking to people at lunch about how they find time to write, how do you find an agent, how do you find your story ideas, how do you find the inspiration for it – I think that’s really important, to get out and be among people who write.”•
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Poor Judge Brown probably thought that by slavishly serving the godz of the age her violations of 18th century concepts like due process and the rule of law would be overlooked. Mayhaps she was merely a Judge ahead of her time?

  2. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  3. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

  4. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

  5. Seventh Circuit Court Judge Diane Wood has stated in “The Rule of Law in Times of Stress” (2003), “that neither laws nor the procedures used to create or implement them should be secret; and . . . the laws must not be arbitrary.” According to the American Bar Association, Wood’s quote drives home this point: The rule of law also requires that people can expect predictable results from the legal system; this is what Judge Wood implies when she says that “the laws must not be arbitrary.” Predictable results mean that people who act in the same way can expect the law to treat them in the same way. If similar actions do not produce similar legal outcomes, people cannot use the law to guide their actions, and a “rule of law” does not exist.

ADVERTISEMENT