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Strategic planning needed to improve child services

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Years before the Department of Child Services came under scrutiny for high-profile failings of its statewide child abuse hotline, the judiciary was exploring ways to improve the entire system of juvenile justice, Indiana Justice Loretta Rush said.

Rush is a member of the DCS interim study commission and has been designated to serve on a proposed commission on improving the status of children. In an interview the day after the study panel wrapped up its work, she said its recommendation to create a commission on children represents an opportunity for stakeholders to speak with one voice.

loretta-rush-15col.jpg Justice Loretta Rush will serve on a commission on improving the status of children proposed by a DCS study panel. (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

“Even before the DCS study committee came about, we were thinking about working on something at the state level,” Rush said. “We need an organization that’s going to meet regularly with individuals with authority at the table so it can be productive.”

Scrutiny of DCS’s handling of hotline calls in the wake of child deaths spurred the study commission. But Rush said DCS reform efforts began in 2008 when she was among judges and court administration staff tapped by then-Chief Justice Randall Shepard to find ways to improve collaboration on juvenile issues among the executive, legislative and judicial branches.

Part of the result was a National Center for State Courts analysis and strategic plan completed in March. It noted that more than 30 entities, committees or groups focus on child services in the state. “The existing committees and entities tend to focus on certain specific projects or on an

immediate need/crisis, but there are no overall strategic planning efforts,” the NCSC report said.

The NCSC recommended creation of a statewide commission on children that would bring together stakeholders. Draft legislation approved by the study commission would do just that. A separate proposed commission would have direct oversight of DCS.

Morgan Superior Judge Christopher Burnham served with Rush on the interim study committee and also was among trial court judges that Shepard tasked to study reforms in 2008. Burnham is optimistic proposed reforms will have momentum in the 2013 General Assembly.

“I think with the ideas that were put forth and the unanimity that came out of the committee as far as the legislators participating, I think there’s going to be some movement in the next session,” Burnham said.

In addition to the proposed commissions, the DCS study panel also recommended legislation and policy reforms that would:

• Route calls to the statewide child abuse hotline back to local DCS offices, where determinations will be made on necessary investigation and follow up;

• Reduce the number of hotline calls “screened out” and not referred for investigation;

• Restore the authority of prosecutors to file Child in Need of Services petitions;

• Require disclosure of DCS investigations and CHINS designations in petitions to modify visitation, custody or guardianship; and

• Localize decision-making regarding child fatality review teams.

Acting DCS Director John Ryan said in an email that the agency “will continue to work to be a resource for the legislature and the new administration as we explore the feasibility of the proposals during the 2013 General Assembly.”

Christy Denault, a spokeswoman for the transition team of Gov.-elect Mike Pence, said there would be no comment on the study commission’s proposals.

The proposed commissions on DCS oversight and improving the status of children can be successful, said interim study committee co-chair Sen. Travis Holdman, R-Markle.

“There’s no reason why they shouldn’t be,” Holdman said. “We have the right people on those committees. There’s been a whole new spirit of cooperation and communication (from DCS), and it’s been invaluable,” he said.

travis holdman Holdman

Study committee co-chair Rep. Kevin Mahan, R-Hartford City, said the theme of proposed revisions is shifting power back to local DCS offices and case workers.

“I think the public perception was this study committee was going to just be a big partisan fight,” Mahan said. “I was very pleased to see Democrats, Republicans and lay people sit on a committee where we talked about what we can do to take a system that has been improved and truly make it better.”

Holdman said Rush had been an early advocate for establishing a commission on improving the status of children in addition to a panel that would oversee DCS.

Innovative approaches to the persistent problems of child abuse and juvenile crime are likelier to happen when stakeholders from DCS, the judiciary, the Legislature, education, health care, mental health service providers and the public are involved, Rush said. The proposed 12-member commission on children would have such membership.

The commission would have a broad mandate, according to the draft legislation. It would evaluate DCS policies and practices and propose legislation on services and funding. The commission also would annually review key state rankings on a host of measures of children’s well-being. Those markers include academic success, early childhood education, childhood poverty and hunger, health, child abuse and neglect, detention rates and infant mortality.

That kind of data collection hasn’t been an emphasis in the past, Rush said.

Rush presided over a Tippecanoe Superior Court that handled juvenile and family court matters before she joined the Supreme Court in November. She made a point of making the Tippecanoe County court as open as possible. “The response is just tremendous,” she said.

People respond when they learn of the traumas children are going through in their communities, Rush said. She noted examples from her experience including a child removed from a home that contained a meth lab, and a 10-year-old who appeared in her court who was pregnant.

In Tippecanoe County, Rush said youth mentoring programs and after-school programs had made a difference, as had a community program to supply young people in need with backpacks full of food when they left school each Friday. Alternatives had reduced the population of juveniles in detention by 50 percent without increasing arrests.

“The government can’t do it alone,” she said. “It has to be communitywide and statewide.”

Rush said she doesn’t expect to actively lobby for passage of the measures that emerged from the study committee. She said her role is different.

“For me, it’s to keep shining the spotlight on youth,” she said, “and don’t accept the status quo.”•

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Kids commissions

Draft legislation emerged from the interim study commission examining issues surrounding the Indiana Department of Child Services. Below are links to two pieces of proposed legislation that would:

Create a DCS oversight committee.
http://www.in.gov/legislative/interim/committee/prelim/CSIC03.pdf

Create a commission on improving the status of children.
http://www.in.gov/legislative/interim/committee/prelim/CSIC02.pdf

Other recommendations and minutes of the study commission can be viewed at:
http://www.in.gov/legislative/interim/committee/csic.html

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  1. Good luck, but as I have documented in three Hail Mary's to the SCOTUS, two applications (2007 & 2013),a civil rights suit and my own kicked-to-the-curb prayer for mandamus. all supported in detailed affidavits with full legal briefing (never considered), the ISC knows that the BLE operates "above the law" (i.e. unconstitutionally) and does not give a damn. In fact, that is how it was designed to control the lawyers. IU Law Prof. Patrick Baude blew the whistle while he was Ind Bar Examiner President back in 1993, even he was shut down. It is a masonic system that blackballs those whom the elite disdain. Here is the basic thrust:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackballing When I asked why I was initially denied, the court's foremost jester wrote back that the ten examiners all voted, and I did not gain the needed votes for approval (whatever that is, probably ten) and thus I was not in .. nothing written, no explanation, just go away or appeal ... and if you appeal and disagree with their system .. proof positive you lack character and fitness. It is both arbitrary and capricious by its very design. The Hoosier legal elites are monarchical minded, and rejected me for life for ostensibly failing to sufficiently respect man's law (due to my stated regard for God's law -- which they questioned me on, after remanding me for a psych eval for holding such Higher Law beliefs) while breaking their own rules, breaking federal statutory law, and violating federal and state constitutions and ancient due process standards .. all well documented as they "processed me" over many years.... yes years ... they have few standards that they will not bulldoze to get to the end desired. And the ISC knows this, and they keep it in play. So sad, And the fed courts refuse to do anything, and so the blackballing show goes on ... it is the Indy way. My final experience here: https://www.scribd.com/document/299040062/Brown-ind-Bar-memo-Pet-cert I will open my files to anyone interested in seeing justice dawn over Indy. My cases are an open book, just ask.

  2. Looks like 2017 will be another notable year for these cases. I have a Grandson involved in a CHINS case that should never have been. He and the whole family are being held hostage by CPS and the 'current mood' of the CPS caseworker. If the parents disagree with a decision, they are penalized. I, along with other were posting on Jasper County Online News, but all were quickly warned to remove posts. I totally understand that some children need these services, but in this case, it was mistakes, covered by coorcement of father to sign papers, lies and cover-ups. The most astonishing thing was within 2 weeks of this child being placed with CPS, a private adoption agency was asking questions regarding child's family in the area. I believe a photo that was taken by CPS manager at the very onset during the CHINS co-ocerment and the intent was to make money. I have even been warned not to post or speak to anyone regarding this case. Parents have completed all requirements, met foster parents, get visitation 2 days a week, and still the next court date is all the way out till May 1, which gives them(CPS) plenty of to time make further demands (which I expect) No trust of these 'seasoned' case managers, as I have already learned too much about their dirty little tricks. If they discover that I have posted here, I expect they will not be happy and penalized parents again. Still a Hostage.

  3. They say it was a court error, however they fail to mention A.R. was on the run from the law and was hiding. Thus why she didn't receive anything from her public defender. Step mom is filing again for adoption of the two boys she has raised. A.R. is a criminal with a serious heroin addiction. She filed this appeal MORE than 30 days after the final decision was made from prison. Report all the facts not just some.

  4. Hysteria? Really Ben? Tell the young lady reported on in the link below that worrying about the sexualizing of our children is mere hysteria. Such thinking is common in the Royal Order of Jesters and other running sex vacays in Thailand or Brazil ... like Indy's Jared Fogle. Those tempted to call such concerns mere histronics need to think on this: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-12-year-old-girl-live-streamed-her-suicide-it-took-two-weeks-for-facebook-to-take-the-video-down/ar-AAlT8ka?li=AA4ZnC&ocid=spartanntp

  5. This is happening so much. Even in 2016.2017. I hope the father sue for civil rights violation. I hope he sue as more are doing and even without a lawyer as pro-se, he got a good one here. God bless him.

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