Leadership in Law - Nominee Information

Leadership in LawIndiana lawyers work diligently to make this state a place the Indiana Lawyer is proud to call home. Through professional commitments, social and civic involvement, and community volunteerism, lawyers serve a diverse citizenry and business community. The Indiana Lawyer annually honors members of the legal community who have shown a commitment to their profession and the clients they serve with Leadership in Law Distinguished Barrister and the Up and Coming Lawyer Awards.

Deadline for submission of nominees is Jan. 20, 2016.

New and past honorees will be celebrated at a reception in May 2016.

Award Criteria

The Indiana Lawyer invites you to nominate a member of Indiana’s legal community for the 2016 Leadership in Law Award. Attorneys eligible for nomination as a Distinguished Barrister have practiced law a minimum of 20 years, and attorneys eligible for nomination as an Up and Coming Lawyer have been practicing 10 years or less. Nominations may be submitted by a colleague, community member, or the nominee. Nominations should provide detail as to why the individual being nominated deserves recognition by the legal community. Recipients of the awards will be selected based the on the following criteria:

  1. Achievement in the legal profession and involvement in professional legal organizations
  2. Community contributions made through support of social and civic community-based organizations and programs
  3. Facilitation of mentoring relationships with young lawyers (Distinguished Barrister nominees only)
  4. Narrative describing what makes this young lawyer stand out among his/her peer group (Up and Coming nominees only).

Past recipients are not eligible for nomination. View the previous award winners list here.

Selection Process

Only COMPLETE nominations received by Jan. 20, 2016, will be considered. The presentation of the awards will take place during the Indiana Lawyer’s annual Leadership in Law reception in May 2016.

Nomination Guidelines

Prepare and submit a nomination packet for each lawyer being nominated. Please include the following information in each nomination packet:

  1. Completed nomination form
  2. Nominee’s resume (if available)
  3. Nomination narrative (please complete if not using the online submission form): Using the award criteria outlined, indicate why this nominee is deserving of recognition. Specify the nature of the nominee’s professional achievements, involvement, and community service. Whenever possible, provide specific documentation or other materials that demonstrate the nominee’s dedication to his or her community and the legal profession. Anecdotal examples and stories that help the awards committee get to know the nominee personally and professionally are encouraged.  Nominators of Up and Coming Lawyer candidates may ask the nominee to submit a narrative describing his/her career aspirations, if desired.
  4. Letters of support from other individuals and/or organizations that are aware of the nominee’s professional achievements or contributions to his/her community may be included.

Options for submitting nominations:

  • Use the online nomination form to complete the nomination process and send resume, letters of recommendation, and other documents to klucas@ibj.com (Print the nomination form and mail the nomination packet to Kelly Lucas, editor & publisher, Indiana Lawyer, 41 E. Washington St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN  46204
  • Email the nomination packet to klucas@ibj.com.

Please direct questions to Kelly Lucas at 317-472-5233 or 800-968-1225, ext. 233, or klucas@ibj.com.

klucas@ibj.com

Indiana lawyers work diligently to make this state a place the Indiana Lawyer is proud to call home. Through professional commitments, social and civic involvement, and community volunteerism, lawyers serve a diverse citizenry and business community. The Indiana Lawyer annually honors members of the legal community who have shown a commitment to their profession and the clients they serve with Leadership in Law Distinguished Barrister and the Up and Coming Lawyer Awards.
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  1. The practitioners and judges who hail E-filing as the Saviour of the West need to contain their respective excitements. E-filing is federal court requires the practitioner to cram his motion practice into pigeonholes created by IT people. Compound motions or those seeking alternative relief are effectively barred, unless the practitioner wants to receive a tart note from some functionary admonishing about the "problem". E-filing is just another method by which courts and judges transfer their burden to practitioners, who are the really the only powerless components of the system. Of COURSE it is easier for the court to require all of its imput to conform to certain formats, but this imposition does NOT improve the quality of the practice of law and does NOT improve the ability of the practitioner to advocate for his client or to fashion pleadings that exactly conform to his client's best interests. And we should be very wary of the disingenuous pablum about the costs. The courts will find a way to stick it to the practitioner. Lake County is a VERY good example of this rapaciousness. Any one who does not believe this is invited to review the various special fees that system imposes upon practitioners- as practitioners- and upon each case ON TOP of the court costs normal in every case manually filed. Jurisprudence according to Aldous Huxley.

  2. Any attorneys who practice in federal court should be able to say the same as I can ... efiling is great. I have been doing it in fed court since it started way back. Pacer has its drawbacks, but the ability to hit an e-docket and pull up anything and everything onscreen is a huge plus for a litigator, eps the sole practitioner, who lacks a filing clerk and the paralegal support of large firms. Were I an Indiana attorney I would welcome this great step forward.

  3. Can we get full disclosure on lobbyist's payments to legislatures such as Mr Buck? AS long as there are idiots that are disrespectful of neighbors and intent on shooting fireworks every night, some kind of regulations are needed.

  4. I am the mother of the child in this case. My silence on the matter was due to the fact that I filed, both in Illinois and Indiana, child support cases. I even filed supporting documentation with the Indiana family law court. Not sure whether this information was provided to the court of appeals or not. Wish the case was done before moving to Indiana, because no matter what, there is NO WAY the state of Illinois would have allowed an appeal on a child support case!

  5. "No one is safe when the Legislature is in session."

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