Leadership in Law - Nominee Information

Leadership in LawIndiana lawyers work diligently to make this state a place the Indiana Lawyer is proud to call home. Through professional commitments, social and civic involvement, and community volunteerism, lawyers serve a diverse citizenry and business community. The Indiana Lawyer annually honors members of the legal community who have shown a commitment to their profession and the clients they serve with Leadership in Law Distinguished Barrister and the Up and Coming Lawyer Awards.

Deadline for submission of nominees is Jan. 20, 2016.

New and past honorees will be celebrated at a reception in May 2016.

Award Criteria

The Indiana Lawyer invites you to nominate a member of Indiana’s legal community for the 2016 Leadership in Law Award. Attorneys eligible for nomination as a Distinguished Barrister have practiced law a minimum of 20 years, and attorneys eligible for nomination as an Up and Coming Lawyer have been practicing 10 years or less. Nominations may be submitted by a colleague, community member, or the nominee. Nominations should provide detail as to why the individual being nominated deserves recognition by the legal community. Recipients of the awards will be selected based the on the following criteria:

  1. Achievement in the legal profession and involvement in professional legal organizations
  2. Community contributions made through support of social and civic community-based organizations and programs
  3. Facilitation of mentoring relationships with young lawyers (Distinguished Barrister nominees only)
  4. Narrative describing what makes this young lawyer stand out among his/her peer group (Up and Coming nominees only).

Past recipients are not eligible for nomination. View the previous award winners list here.

Selection Process

Only COMPLETE nominations received by Jan. 20, 2016, will be considered. The presentation of the awards will take place during the Indiana Lawyer’s annual Leadership in Law reception in May 2016.

Nomination Guidelines

Prepare and submit a nomination packet for each lawyer being nominated. Please include the following information in each nomination packet:

  1. Completed nomination form
  2. Nominee’s resume (if available)
  3. Nomination narrative (please complete if not using the online submission form): Using the award criteria outlined, indicate why this nominee is deserving of recognition. Specify the nature of the nominee’s professional achievements, involvement, and community service. Whenever possible, provide specific documentation or other materials that demonstrate the nominee’s dedication to his or her community and the legal profession. Anecdotal examples and stories that help the awards committee get to know the nominee personally and professionally are encouraged.  Nominators of Up and Coming Lawyer candidates may ask the nominee to submit a narrative describing his/her career aspirations, if desired.
  4. Letters of support from other individuals and/or organizations that are aware of the nominee’s professional achievements or contributions to his/her community may be included.

Options for submitting nominations:

  • Use the online nomination form to complete the nomination process and send resume, letters of recommendation, and other documents to klucas@ibj.com (Print the nomination form and mail the nomination packet to Kelly Lucas, editor & publisher, Indiana Lawyer, 41 E. Washington St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN  46204
  • Email the nomination packet to klucas@ibj.com.

Please direct questions to Kelly Lucas at 317-472-5233 or 800-968-1225, ext. 233, or klucas@ibj.com.

klucas@ibj.com

Indiana lawyers work diligently to make this state a place the Indiana Lawyer is proud to call home. Through professional commitments, social and civic involvement, and community volunteerism, lawyers serve a diverse citizenry and business community. The Indiana Lawyer annually honors members of the legal community who have shown a commitment to their profession and the clients they serve with Leadership in Law Distinguished Barrister and the Up and Coming Lawyer Awards.
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  1. My daughters' kids was removed from the home in March 2015, she has been in total compliance with the requirements of cps, she is going to court on the 4th of August. Cps had called the first team meeting last Monday to inform her that she was not in compliance, by not attending home based therapy, which is done normally with the children in the home, and now they are recommending her to have a psych evaluation, and they are also recommending that the children not be returned to the home. This is all bull hockey. In this so called team meeting which I did attend for the best interest of my child and grandbabies, I learned that no matter how much she does that cps is not trying to return the children and the concerns my daughter has is not important to cps, they only told her that she is to do as they say and not to resist or her rights will be terminated. I cant not believe the way Cps treats people knowing if they threaten you with loosing your kids you will do anything to get them back. My daughter is drug free she has never put her hands on any of her children she does not scream at her babies at all, but she is only allowed to see her kids 6 hours a week and someone has to supervise. Lets all tske a stand against the child protection services. THEY CAN NO LONGER TAKE CHILDREN FROM THERE PARENTS.

  2. Planned Parenthood has the government so trained . . .

  3. In a related story, an undercover video team released this footage of the government's search of the Planned Parenthood facilities. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXVN7QJ8m88

  4. Here is an excellent movie for those wanting some historical context, as well as encouragement to stand against dominant political forces and knaves who carry the staves of governance to enforce said dominance: http://www.copperheadthemovie.com/

  5. Not enough copperheads here to care anymore, is my guess. Otherwise, a totally pointless gesture. ... Oh wait: was this done because somebody want to avoid bad press - or was it that some weak kneed officials cravenly fear "protest" violence by "urban youths.."

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