Leadership in Law - Nominee Information

Leadership in LawIndiana lawyers work diligently to make this state a place the Indiana Lawyer is proud to call home. Through professional commitments, social and civic involvement, and community volunteerism, lawyers serve a diverse citizenry and business community. The Indiana Lawyer annually honors members of the legal community who have shown a commitment to their profession and the clients they serve with Leadership in Law Distinguished Barrister and the Up and Coming Lawyer Awards.

Deadline for submission of nominees is Jan. 20, 2015.

New and past honorees will be celebrated at a reception in May 2015.

Award Criteria

The Indiana Lawyer invites you to nominate a member of Indiana’s legal community for the 2015 Leadership in Law Award. Attorneys eligible for nomination as a Distinguished Barrister have practiced law a minimum of 20 years, and attorneys eligible for nomination as an Up and Coming Lawyer have been practicing 10 years or less. Nominations may be submitted by a colleague, community member, or the nominee. Nominations should provide detail as to why the individual being nominated deserves recognition by the legal community. Recipients of the awards will be selected based the on the following criteria:

  1. Achievement in the legal profession and involvement in professional legal organizations
  2. Community contributions made through support of social and civic community-based organizations and programs
  3. Facilitation of mentoring relationships with young lawyers (Distinguished Barrister nominees only)
  4. Narrative describing what makes this young lawyer stand out among his/her peer group (Up and Coming nominees only).

Past recipients are not eligible for nomination. View the previous award winners list here.

Selection Process

Only COMPLETE nominations received by Jan. 20, 2015, will be considered. The presentation of the awards will take place during the Indiana Lawyer’s annual Leadership in Law reception in May 2015.

Nomination Guidelines

Prepare and submit a nomination packet for each lawyer being nominated. Please include the following information in each nomination packet:

  1. Completed nomination form
  2. Nominee’s resume (if available)
  3. Nomination narrative (please complete if not using the online submission form): Using the award criteria outlined, indicate why this nominee is deserving of recognition. Specify the nature of the nominee’s professional achievements, involvement, and community service. Whenever possible, provide specific documentation or other materials that demonstrate the nominee’s dedication to his or her community and the legal profession. Anecdotal examples and stories that help the awards committee get to know the nominee personally and professionally are encouraged.  Nominators of Up and Coming Lawyer candidates may ask the nominee to submit a narrative describing his/her career aspirations, if desired.
  4. Letters of support from other individuals and/or organizations that are aware of the nominee’s professional achievements or contributions to his/her community may be included.

Options for submitting nominations:

  • Use the online nomination form to complete the nomination process and send resume, letters of recommendation, and other documents to klucas@ibj.com (Print the nomination form and mail the nomination packet to Kelly Lucas, editor & publisher, Indiana Lawyer, 41 E. Washington St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN  46204
  • Email the nomination packet to klucas@ibj.com.

Please direct questions to Kelly Lucas at 317-472-5233 or 800-968-1225, ext. 233, or klucas@ibj.com.

klucas@ibj.com








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  1. Hail to our Constitutional Law Expert in the Executive Office! “What you’re not paying attention to is the fact that I just took an action to change the law,” Obama said.

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