Trial Reports

The Indiana Lawyer encourages attorneys to submit trial reports on verdicts and settlements received in Indiana courts. Trial reports are published on theindianalawyer.com and in the newspaper based on space availability.

To be published, trial reports must include the names of plaintiff and defense attorneys along with the case name and number. (*See exceptions listed below.) Lawyers are encouraged to include the supplemental information requested in the trial report form to enhance the value of the report. The case information box allows the submitting attorney to provide a narrative, up to 300 words, describing the case facts, interesting issues involved and outcome.

Attorneys submitting trial reports are required to submit a copy of the report to the opposing counsel. When submitting the trial report to the Indiana Lawyer, the submitting attorney must verify in the space provided on the form that the report has been sent to opposing counsel and include the date the report was sent. No trial report will be printed without this verification. Any objections to the report by opposing counsel should be made to the submitting attorney. The trial report will be held by the Indiana Lawyer for two weeks from the date submitted to give counsel time to discuss and resolve issues. The name of the attorney submitting the report will be published with the report.

Questions about the Indiana Lawyer trial report policy should be directed to editor Jennifer Nelson at 317-472-5234 or 800-425-2201, ext. 234; or jnelson@ibj.com.

*Exceptions to data requirement:

The name and number of a case involving a sexual assault or molestation may be withheld.

The name and location of practice of a physician involved in a medical malpractice settlement may be withheld. In medical malpractice settlements bound by confidentiality agreements, the portion of the agreement binding the parties to secrecy must accompany the report form. It will be used for verification purposes only.


I certify that I have sent a copy of this report, via e-mail or hard copy, to the opposing party (your signature). You must include the date on which you sent the copy to opposing counsel.



Action is Required.

Name of Case is Required.

Court & Case Number is Required.

Injuries is Required.

Court Date is Required.

City is Required.

Judge is Required.

Disposition is Required.

Plaintiff Attorney Name Required.

Defendant Attorney Name Required.

Insurance is Required.

Signature is Required.

Submitting is Required.

Submitting Attorney Phone is Required.

Submitting Attorney Phone is Required.

Case Information is Required.

Date is Required.

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  1. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  2. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  3. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  4. Different rules for different folks....

  5. I would strongly suggest anyone seeking mediation check the experience of the mediator. There are retired judges who decide to become mediators. Their training and experience is in making rulings which is not the point of mediation.

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