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Terre Haute attorney dies

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A Terre Haute attorney and former member of the Indiana House of Representatives died Monday.

John A. Kesler Sr., 87, was an attorney in Terre Haute for nearly 60 years. He was admitted to the Indiana and Illinois bars in 1951 after receiving his J.D. from Indiana University School of Law. He served in the House of Representatives from 1969 to 1973.

Kesler also served as probate commissioner of the Vigo Circuit Court and as Vigo County chief deputy prosecutor. He was a member of the American Bar Association, American Trial Lawyers Association, Indiana State Bar Association and Terre Haute Bar Association.

He was a licensed pilot and served in the South Pacific in the U.S. Army during World War II, receiving four Bronze Stars. Kesler was active in veterans’ affairs and other community organizations. He was commissioned as a Sagamore of the Wabash by then-Gov. Joseph Kernan.

He is survived by his wife, Maxine Weaver Kesler; children Nicki Herrington, Brad (Debby) Kesler, and John (Diana) Kesler II; brother Hurst (Jean) Kesler; nine grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Funeral services are at 1 p.m. Thursday with visitation an hour prior to services at Fitzpatrick Funeral Home, 220 N. Third St., West Terre Haute.
 

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  1. Family court judges never fail to surprise me with their irrational thinking. First of all any man who abuses his wife is not fit to be a parent. A man who can't control his anger should not be allowed around his child unsupervised period. Just because he's never been convicted of abusing his child doesn't mean he won't and maybe he hasn't but a man that has such poor judgement and control is not fit to parent without oversight - only a moron would think otherwise. Secondly, why should the mother have to pay? He's the one who made the poor decisions to abuse and he should be the one to pay the price - monetarily and otherwise. Yes it's sad that the little girl may be deprived of her father, but really what kind of father is he - the one that abuses her mother the one that can't even step up and do what's necessary on his own instead the abused mother is to pay for him???? What is this Judge thinking? Another example of how this world rewards bad behavior and punishes those who do right. Way to go Judge - NOT.

  2. Right on. Legalize it. We can take billions away from the drug cartels and help reduce violence in central America and more unwanted illegal immigration all in one fell swoop. cut taxes on the savings from needless incarcerations. On and stop eroding our fourth amendment freedom or whatever's left of it.

  3. "...a switch from crop production to hog production "does not constitute a significant change."??? REALLY?!?! Any judge that cannot see a significant difference between a plant and an animal needs to find another line of work.

  4. Why do so many lawyers get away with lying in court, Jamie Yoak?

  5. Future generations will be amazed that we prosecuted people for possessing a harmless plant. The New York Times came out in favor of legalization in Saturday's edition of the newspaper.

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