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Three decades of finalists

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Each time a vacancy occurs on the Indiana Supreme Court, applicants go before the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission to face questions about why they should be elevated to the highest bench in the state judiciary. Three individuals are chosen as finalists and those names are sent to the governor, who makes the final decision. Here is a look at those who’ve been finalists in the past 25 years and their positions or titles at that time.



2010 – Seat being vacated by Justice Theodore R. Boehm

34 applicants; 9 semi-finalists

• Hon. Steven H. David, Boone Circuit Court

• Hon. Robyn L. Moberly, Marion Superior Court

• Karl Mulvaney, Indianaplis attorney

Gov. Mitch Daniels has 60 days in which to select the next justice.

 

1999 – Seat vacated by Justice Myra Selby

25 initial applicants; 7 semi-finalists

• Hon. Robert D. Rucker, Indiana Court of Appeals; chosen by Gov. Frank O’Bannon

• Hon. Nancy Vaidik, Porter Superior Court

• Mary Beth Ramey, Indianapolis attorney

 

1996 – Seat vacated by Justice Richard DeBruler

23 or 24 initial applicants; 9 semi-finalists

• Theodore R. Boehm, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Evan Bayh

• Hon. Sanford M. Brook, St. Joseph Superior Court

• Hon. Edward Najam, Indiana Court of Appeals

 

1994 – Seat vacated by Justice Richard Givan

10 initial applicants but extended deadline resulted in14 applicants; 6 semi-finalists

• Myra C. Selby, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. Betty A. Barteau, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Anne Marie Sedwick, Jeffersonville attorney

 

1993 – Seat vacated by Justice Jon D. Krahulik

28 applicants for opening on both the Supreme Court and the Indiana Court of Appeals; 10 semi-finalists

• Frank E. Sullivan, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. Betty A. Barteau, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Hon. James S. Kirsch, Marion Superior Court

 

1990 – Seat vacated by Justice Alfred Pivarnik

13 applicants; 5 semi-finalists

• Jon D. Krahulik, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. John G. Baker, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Hon. Jeanne Jourdan, St. Joseph Superior Court

 

1985/1986 – Seat vacated by Justice Dixon Prentice

Number of applicants and semi-finalists not known or a matter of public record

• Brent E. Dickson, Lafayette attorney; chosen by Gov. Robert Orr

• Hon. Robert Staton, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Lila J. Cornell, Indianapolis attorney

 

1985 – Seat vacated by Justice Donald Hunter

36 applicants; number of semi-finalists not known or a matter of matter of public record

• Hon. Randall T. Shepard, Vanderburgh Superior Court; chosen by Gov. Orr

• Patrick Woods Harrison, Columbus attorney

• Hon. Raymond Thomas Green, Bartholomew Circuit Court

Prior to that time, the last Indiana Supreme Court opening came in 1977 when Justice Pivarnik replaced Justice Norman Arterburn.

Source: IL archives and research
 

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  1. Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

  2. I pd for a bankruptcy years ago with Mr Stiles and just this week received a garnishment from my pay! He never filed it even though he told me he would! Don't let this guy practice law ever again!!!

  3. Excellent initiative on the part of the AG. Thankfully someone takes action against predators taking advantage of people who have already been through the wringer. Well done!

  4. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

  5. Pass Legislation to require guilty defendants to pay for the costs of lab work, etc as part of court costs...

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