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Three decades of finalists

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Each time a vacancy occurs on the Indiana Supreme Court, applicants go before the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission to face questions about why they should be elevated to the highest bench in the state judiciary. Three individuals are chosen as finalists and those names are sent to the governor, who makes the final decision. Here is a look at those who’ve been finalists in the past 25 years and their positions or titles at that time.



2010 – Seat being vacated by Justice Theodore R. Boehm

34 applicants; 9 semi-finalists

• Hon. Steven H. David, Boone Circuit Court

• Hon. Robyn L. Moberly, Marion Superior Court

• Karl Mulvaney, Indianaplis attorney

Gov. Mitch Daniels has 60 days in which to select the next justice.

 

1999 – Seat vacated by Justice Myra Selby

25 initial applicants; 7 semi-finalists

• Hon. Robert D. Rucker, Indiana Court of Appeals; chosen by Gov. Frank O’Bannon

• Hon. Nancy Vaidik, Porter Superior Court

• Mary Beth Ramey, Indianapolis attorney

 

1996 – Seat vacated by Justice Richard DeBruler

23 or 24 initial applicants; 9 semi-finalists

• Theodore R. Boehm, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Evan Bayh

• Hon. Sanford M. Brook, St. Joseph Superior Court

• Hon. Edward Najam, Indiana Court of Appeals

 

1994 – Seat vacated by Justice Richard Givan

10 initial applicants but extended deadline resulted in14 applicants; 6 semi-finalists

• Myra C. Selby, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. Betty A. Barteau, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Anne Marie Sedwick, Jeffersonville attorney

 

1993 – Seat vacated by Justice Jon D. Krahulik

28 applicants for opening on both the Supreme Court and the Indiana Court of Appeals; 10 semi-finalists

• Frank E. Sullivan, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. Betty A. Barteau, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Hon. James S. Kirsch, Marion Superior Court

 

1990 – Seat vacated by Justice Alfred Pivarnik

13 applicants; 5 semi-finalists

• Jon D. Krahulik, Indianapolis attorney; chosen by Gov. Bayh

• Hon. John G. Baker, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Hon. Jeanne Jourdan, St. Joseph Superior Court

 

1985/1986 – Seat vacated by Justice Dixon Prentice

Number of applicants and semi-finalists not known or a matter of public record

• Brent E. Dickson, Lafayette attorney; chosen by Gov. Robert Orr

• Hon. Robert Staton, Indiana Court of Appeals

• Lila J. Cornell, Indianapolis attorney

 

1985 – Seat vacated by Justice Donald Hunter

36 applicants; number of semi-finalists not known or a matter of matter of public record

• Hon. Randall T. Shepard, Vanderburgh Superior Court; chosen by Gov. Orr

• Patrick Woods Harrison, Columbus attorney

• Hon. Raymond Thomas Green, Bartholomew Circuit Court

Prior to that time, the last Indiana Supreme Court opening came in 1977 when Justice Pivarnik replaced Justice Norman Arterburn.

Source: IL archives and research
 

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  1. Frankly, it is tragic that you are even considering going to an expensive, unaccredited "law school." It is extremely difficult to get a job with a degree from a real school. If you are going to make the investment of time, money, and tears into law school, it should not be to a place that won't actually enable you to practice law when you graduate.

  2. As a lawyer who grew up in Fort Wayne (but went to a real law school), it is not that hard to find a mentor in the legal community without your school's assistance. One does not need to pay tens of thousands of dollars to go to an unaccredited legal diploma mill to get a mentor. Having a mentor means precisely nothing if you cannot get a job upon graduation, and considering that the legal job market is utterly terrible, these students from Indiana Tech are going to be adrift after graduation.

  3. 700,000 to 800,000 Americans are arrested for marijuana possession each year in the US. Do we need a new justice center if we decriminalize marijuana by having the City Council enact a $100 fine for marijuana possession and have the money go towards road repair?

  4. I am sorry to hear this.

  5. I tried a case in Judge Barker's court many years ago and I recall it vividly as a highlight of my career. I don't get in federal court very often but found myself back there again last Summer. We had both aged a bit but I must say she was just as I had remembered her. Authoritative, organized and yes, human ...with a good sense of humor. I also appreciated that even though we were dealing with difficult criminal cases, she treated my clients with dignity and understanding. My clients certainly respected her. Thanks for this nice article. Congratulations to Judge Barker for reaching another milestone in a remarkable career.

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