ILNews

Tipton City Court judge dies

Jennifer Nelson
August 19, 2009
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Tipton City Court Judge Lewis Daily Harper died Aug. 14 at the age of 85. Judge Harper became city judge in 1997; he also worked as a real estate broker.

The Tipton native served as a B-24 Bomber pilot in World War II from December 1942 to October 1945. He belonged to many community organizations, including American Legion Post #46 and the Fraternal Order of Police.

He is survived by his wife, Wilma Doris Garmon; children Stephen Harper (Sandy) and Linda Boyer; stepchildren Teresa O'Rear, Sherry Townsend, and Alan O'Rear; brother Elbert Harper; sister Wilda Robison; and grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Harper's successor will be named by the governor; in the meantime, Tipton Circuit Judge Thomas R. Lett will serve in the City Court. He was temporarily transferred there by a Tuesday order from the Indiana Supreme Court.

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