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When security actions become unconstitutional snooping

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Fred Cate still has his button that reads, “Another Hysterical Librarian.”

The message invokes a remark made by former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft when the USA Patriot Act of 2001 was first being debated in Congress. One major concern was that the government would be able to access private individuals’ reading records from public libraries, and Ashcroft’s irreverent quip became a rallying cry.
 

fredcate02-15col.jpg Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor Fred Cate is one of the country’s leading experts in privacy and security laws. (IL Photo/ Aaron P. Bernstein)

Twelve years after the passage of the Patriot Act, Americans are learning the surveillance is much broader than anyone ever imagined. Classified information released by National Security Administration whistleblower Edward Snowden earlier this year revealed the federal government had expanded its program from watching suspected terrorists to spying on foreign nationals, foreign heads of state and domestic citizens.

“We’d be happy if it was just librarians,” Cate said.

The Indiana University Maurer School of Law professor and director of the IU Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research has had a front row seat to the debate between protection against terrorism and privacy rights of individuals. His service on a standing cybersecurity committee with the Department of Homeland Security and with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the Department of Defense have given him access to classified information and a deeper look into the government’s surveillance activities.

Still, he was shocked not only by what Snowden disclosed but also that Snowden, as an employee at a defense contractor, had access to such high-level information.

Even with the passage of the Patriot Act in the weeks after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, no one expected the government would cross the line of conducting surveillance on U.S. citizens. Cate thought the executive branch might overreach at times but only in special circumstances.

However, the so-called “Snowden flakes” have opened a pathway to challenging what the government has been doing. Cate, along with IU Maurer professor David Fidler, has now joined an effort to use this pathway to nudge the Supreme Court of the United States to start reigning in the secret surveillance program.

Cate was the lead author of an amicus curiae brief (signed by Fidler and 12 other professors from universities around the country) in support of a petition asking the nation’s highest court to take the extraordinary step of issuing a writ of mandamus and vacate a previously secret order for the collection of domestic telephone records.

If the Supreme Court acts, Cate said, it would indicate the court thinks the situation is severe enough to get involved. It would send a signal that the government is not free to do anything it wants.

‘Telephony metadata’

Among the documents Snowden unveiled was an April 2013 order by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court compelling Verizon Business Network Services Inc. to turn over daily phone records of calls made from the United States to foreign countries as well as totally within the continental borders.
 

 

fidler-david-mug Fidler

Under terms of the federal law, the activities of FISC are secret and never brought to the public’s attention. The collection of “telephony metadata” on all of Verizon’s nearly 100 million customers who are not directly connected to any specific investigation is viewed as stepping well outside the power granted by the Patriot Act.

“It boggles the mind to understand how this is possible,” Fidler said.

The disclosure of the Verizon order gave the Electronic Privacy Information Center an avenue to bring a judicial challenge. In July, EPIC submitted a petition asking the Supreme Court to grant a writ of mandamus and vacate the order as well as prohibit such future orders.

EPIC, a public-interest research center focusing on privacy and civil liberties, argued it has the ability to challenge the order because it is a Verizon customer. Since the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act was drafted specifically to bar outside individuals and organizations from seeking a review of any order, EPIC asserted it can only obtain relief with a writ of mandamus from the Supreme Court.

Marc Rotenberg, executive director of EPIC, acknowledged while the court has the power to act on the petition, it traditionally has not deployed that authority. But, he said, if ever there was a writ of mandamus petition the Supreme Court should consider, this is it.

Writing the amicus brief was not a labor of love, Cate said. He wanted to push the court to act, in part, because of the work he and other professors have done for the government. As citizens and scholars, he and his colleagues were misled and had their good will taken advantage of, he said.

“The First Amendment concerns are real and substantial,” Cate wrote in the brief. “Although not including the content of communications, the call detail records and telephony metadata of millions of U.S. persons disclosed under the Verizon Order can be highly revealing in ways that may be intrinsically harmful or chill the exercise of protected liberties.”

While the chance of the Supreme Court granting the writ is uncertain, Rotenberg said Cate’s participation will draw the court’s attention as he is “one of the leading experts on surveillance law in the nation.”

Needles in haystacks

Ironically, while the federal government maintains its covert surveillance is keeping the country safe, Cate sees the actions as actually posing a danger to national security and personal privacy.

The National Security Administration is collecting such a vast amount of data, but it is not analyzing the data or, as Cate said, connecting the dots. Even though the NSA has maintained it needs to have a lot of data to find the threat, only a small part of the “black budget” that covers the national intelligence program is spent on data analysis, he said.

Using the government’s analogy of needing more hay to find needles, Cate argued that adding more hay, or data, does not improve the chances of finding a terrorist. Rather than adding more hay, he said, the government really needs a mechanism to find needles.

Fidler pointed out just a few years ago the collection of metadata from all phone calls was not plausible. Now, once again, advances in technology have outpaced the language of the law.

Each innovation sparks a more expansive reading of what is allowed by law. This is going to be a constant source of friction in American democracy in the foreseeable future, Fidler said, which will require a return to debate time and time again.

Rather than trying to put the genie back in the bottle, he said, society should build a new bottle. The country should look for smarter ways to protect itself that are not unconstitutional.

Neither Cate nor Fidler believe the surveillance activities, known to date, are threatening the very foundation of the United States. The current situation is nothing like the risk to democracy brought by the Civil War.

Yet, the revelations have diminished the country’s standing in the world, the Maurer professors said. The U.S. reputation as being a beacon of freedom has been dimmed. Now the world sees the country as a violator of democracy and liberty.

Closer to home there is anger and disappointment. Over the summer, every time the White House issued a denial, Snowden would release contradicting information. The activities of the NSA reached far beyond what Congress and the public had ever been told.

Cate said he is most disheartened that the president did nothing to stop the lying.•

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  • Great article
    Very interesting read..."another hysterical librarian" indeed...will be interesting to see how this develops...thanks for the story IL, and good luck Mr. Cate.

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  1. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

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  3. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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  5. Some in the Hoosier legal elite consider this prayer recommended by the AG seditious, not to mention the Saint who pledged loyalty to God over King and went to the axe for so doing: "Thomas More, counselor of law and statesman of integrity, merry martyr and most human of saints: Pray that, for the glory of God and in the pursuit of His justice, I may be trustworthy with confidences, keen in study, accurate in analysis, correct in conclusion, able in argument, loyal to clients, honest with all, courteous to adversaries, ever attentive to conscience. Sit with me at my desk and listen with me to my clients' tales. Read with me in my library and stand always beside me so that today I shall not, to win a point, lose my soul. Pray that my family may find in me what yours found in you: friendship and courage, cheerfulness and charity, diligence in duties, counsel in adversity, patience in pain—their good servant, and God's first. Amen."

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