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Supreme Court takes 4 cases

September 12, 2011

The Indiana Supreme Court has granted transfer to four cases, including two cases dealing with double jeopardy issues.

In Michael Sharp v. State of Indiana, No. 12S02-1109-CR-544, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed Michael Sharp’s convictions of and sentence for Class A and Class C felony child molesting. His convictions on both charges didn’t violate double jeopardy standards because each offense required additional proof not used to support the other. The Court of Appeals also concluded that a defendant’s credit restricted felon status can’t be taken into consideration on Indiana Appellate Rule 7(B) review.  

In Jerrell D. White v. State of Indiana, No. 15S01-1109-CR-545, the Court of Appeals affirmed Jerrell White’s conviction of Class D felony theft for stealing a cash register and cash from a restaurant, but reversed his conviction of Class D felony receiving stolen property because of double jeopardy violations. The judges also found insufficient evidence to support a habitual offender finding. They affirmed White’s remaining three-year sentence on the theft conviction and remanded with instructions.

On a rehearing petitioned for by the state, the appellate court remanded to the trial court with instructions that it rehear evidence on the habitual offender enhancement, and affirmed its original decision in all other respects.

In Michael W. Baker v. State of Indiana, No. 89S01-1109-CR-543, the Court of Appeals in a not-for-publication decision reversed Michael Baker’s conviction of Class B felony burglary as well as the determination that he’s a habitual offender. The judges ordered an entry of judgment of conviction for criminal trespass and sentence on that offense.

In Michael B. Adams v. State of Indiana, No. 29S02-1109-CR-542, the COA affirmed Michael Adams’ conviction of Class A misdemeanor possession of marijuana and the decision by the trial court to suspend his license and registration. Adams was a passenger in a car pulled over for speeding, and the police officer could smell raw marijuana coming from the car when Adams rolled down his window. There was sufficient evidence to support the conviction, and the license and registration suspensions were appropriate under Indiana Code 35-48-4-15.  

The justices also denied transfer to 23 cases for the week ending Sept. 9.

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