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Conour seeks pre-sentence release

August 1, 2013

Former attorney William Conour has asked a federal judge who ordered him jailed last month in his wire fraud case to free him ahead of his Oct. 17 sentencing.

Conour pleaded guilty July 15 to government charges that he defrauded at least 25 personal-injury and wrongful-death clients of more than $4.5 million he received in negotiated settlements. He entered a plea a short time after he was jailed in June for dissipating assets in violation of terms of bond. Conour since has been held in the Marion County Jail.

The motion for release filed July 19 asks Chief Judge Richard Young of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana to free Conour until October because he doesn’t represent a flight risk, and because he has consented to the government taking possession of any assets that may remain from an inventory of his Carmel home.

“Therefore, the risk of dissipation which previously concerned the court will be eliminated as soon as the government takes control of the remaining assets,” public defender Michael Donahoe wrote in the petition.  

The government has not responded to the motion and Young had not acted on the request as of midday Thursday. The motion notes federal prosecutor Jason Bohm opposes the release request.

Donahoe argues that Conour also needs access to his computer, files and records to help enable more assets to go toward restitution and to defend himself in at least six civil cases in which he is a defendant.

Conour also has “health concerns which can best be addressed if he is released prior to sentencing,” according to the motion. Those include access to cholesterol mediation and “completing dermatology treatment for removal of cancerous and pre-cancerous lesions.”

The motion also states that Conour’s 25-room house on Sedgemoore Circle, currently subject to a foreclosure action, is exposed because of his absence. The motion says its vacancy “will cause a lapse in homeowners insurance coverage and renders the house vulnerable to vandalism and other potential damage by animals, fire, etc. In fact, during a prior period of vacancy the residence suffered extensive damage by squirrels and raccoons.”
 

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