ILBlogs

Jennifer Nelson
Jennifer Mehalik
More First Impressions

Recent Blog Posts

Glass staircases causes problems in Ohio courthouse

Jennifer Nelson
June 12, 2011
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Forget the glass ceiling, now women in one Ohio county have to worry about a glass staircase.
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Attorney pledges $25,000 to find missing IU student

Jennifer Nelson
June 10, 2011
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Not only does the attorney hope to find the missing student, but he wants the city of Bloomington to install more cameras at traffic intersections.
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Santa Claus' letters are safe, for now

Jennifer Nelson
June 9, 2011
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An interesting footnote in an Indiana Court of Appeals opinion on a counterfeit case makes reference to letters from Santa Claus.
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How to be a federal judge

Jennifer Nelson
June 2, 2011
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Several legal organizations have gotten together to produce a pamphlet for law students and new lawyers telling them what to expect if they want to be a federal judge.
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Video games causing more divorces?

Jennifer Nelson
June 1, 2011
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A website called “Divorce Online” claims more women are filing for divorce because their husbands are devoting more time to video games than their marriages.
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Local documentary nominated for Emmy

Jennifer Nelson
May 31, 2011
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The documentary made about a terrorist simulation held at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis in October 2009 was made by local students and WFYI Productions.
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Study for the bar exam by playing a game

Jennifer Nelson
May 25, 2011
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Forget boring books to prepare for the bar exam. Play a board game and become a lawyer!
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Rally planned in response to Barnes ruling

Jennifer Nelson
May 24, 2011
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A Facebook group is calling for people to go to the Statehouse Wednesday at noon and “stand up” for their Fourth Amendment rights following a recent Indiana Supreme Court decision. If you’re going, let us know.
 
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  1. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  2. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  3. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  4. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  5. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

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