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Jennifer Nelson
Jennifer Mehalik
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Professor’s book looks at science behind jury verdicts

Jennifer Nelson
October 11, 2012
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A psychology professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has written a book using, in part, scientific research to form a new theory as to how juries reach decisions.
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The Civil War slowed medical malpractice suits

Jennifer Nelson
October 2, 2012
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Doctors who think people have never been more litigious than they are today can take heart in knowing that people sued their physicians just as much in the 1850s.
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More Democrats than Republicans like how U.S. justices rule

Jennifer Nelson
September 28, 2012
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A recent Gallup poll shows that 57 percent of Democrats approve of the way the United States Supreme Court handles its job. Nearly the same percentage of Republicans disapprove of how the justices are ruling.  The court starts its 2012 term Monday.
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Indiana Supreme Court, ACLU celebrate Constitution Day

Jennifer Nelson
September 17, 2012
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If you are a faithful reader of this blog or a history buff, then you know today is Constitution Day. Three Indiana justices will travel around the state this week visiting schools in honor of Constitution Day.
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Recent law grads: Forget school rankings, focus on jobs

Jennifer Nelson
September 14, 2012
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A recent survey by Kaplan Test Prep shows law school applicants are so focused on where a law school ranks that they don’t think affordability or job placement numbers really matter. But recent grads would advise LSAT takers to think otherwise.
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Attorney launches blog on lawyer troubles

Jennifer Nelson
September 13, 2012
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Rochester attorney Ted Waggoner has launched “Lawyers with Troubles” with the aim to prevent lawyers from repeating the mistakes made by others and finding themselves in hot water.
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Terre Haute federal courthouse escapes closure

Jennifer Nelson
September 12, 2012
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The Judicial Conference of the United States announced Tuesday that it will close six non-resident federal courthouses to save money. The facility in Terre Haute, which was placed on a list for consideration of closure earlier this year, will remain open.
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Studying for the LSAT messed with your brain

Jennifer Nelson
August 29, 2012
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It turns out that preparing to take the LSAT causes tiny structural changes in the brain that physically bolster connections between the areas of the brain needed for reasoning. LSAT test prep providers rejoice.
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  1. Just an aside, but regardless of the outcome, I 'm proud of Judge William Hughes. He was the original magistrate on the Home place issue. He ruled for Home Place, and was primaried by Brainard for it. Their tool Poindexter failed to unseat Hughes, who won support for his honesty and courage throughout the county, and he was reelected Judge of Hamilton County's Superior Court. You can still stand for something and survive. Thanks, Judge Hughes!

  2. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  3. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  4. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  5. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

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