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Jennifer Nelson
Jennifer Mehalik
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Professor’s book looks at science behind jury verdicts

Jennifer Nelson
October 11, 2012
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A psychology professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has written a book using, in part, scientific research to form a new theory as to how juries reach decisions.
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The Civil War slowed medical malpractice suits

Jennifer Nelson
October 2, 2012
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Doctors who think people have never been more litigious than they are today can take heart in knowing that people sued their physicians just as much in the 1850s.
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More Democrats than Republicans like how U.S. justices rule

Jennifer Nelson
September 28, 2012
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A recent Gallup poll shows that 57 percent of Democrats approve of the way the United States Supreme Court handles its job. Nearly the same percentage of Republicans disapprove of how the justices are ruling.  The court starts its 2012 term Monday.
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Indiana Supreme Court, ACLU celebrate Constitution Day

Jennifer Nelson
September 17, 2012
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If you are a faithful reader of this blog or a history buff, then you know today is Constitution Day. Three Indiana justices will travel around the state this week visiting schools in honor of Constitution Day.
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Recent law grads: Forget school rankings, focus on jobs

Jennifer Nelson
September 14, 2012
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A recent survey by Kaplan Test Prep shows law school applicants are so focused on where a law school ranks that they don’t think affordability or job placement numbers really matter. But recent grads would advise LSAT takers to think otherwise.
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Attorney launches blog on lawyer troubles

Jennifer Nelson
September 13, 2012
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Rochester attorney Ted Waggoner has launched “Lawyers with Troubles” with the aim to prevent lawyers from repeating the mistakes made by others and finding themselves in hot water.
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Terre Haute federal courthouse escapes closure

Jennifer Nelson
September 12, 2012
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The Judicial Conference of the United States announced Tuesday that it will close six non-resident federal courthouses to save money. The facility in Terre Haute, which was placed on a list for consideration of closure earlier this year, will remain open.
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Studying for the LSAT messed with your brain

Jennifer Nelson
August 29, 2012
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It turns out that preparing to take the LSAT causes tiny structural changes in the brain that physically bolster connections between the areas of the brain needed for reasoning. LSAT test prep providers rejoice.
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  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

  2. The Department of Education still has over $100 million of ITT Education Services money in the form of $100+ million Letters of Credit. That money was supposed to be used by The DOE to help students. The DOE did nothing to help students. The DOE essentially stole the money from ITT Tech and still has the money. The trustee should be going after the DOE to get the money back for people who are owed that money, including shareholders.

  3. Do you know who the sponsor of the last-minute amendment was?

  4. Law firms of over 50 don't deliver good value, thats what this survey really tells you. Anybody that has seen what they bill for compared to what they deliver knows that already, however.

  5. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

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