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Disciplinary Actions - 10/8/14

October 8, 2014
KEYWORDS Courts / Discipline / neglect

The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission brings charges against attorneys who have violated the state’s rules for admission to the bar and Rules of Professional Conduct. The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications brings charges against judges, judicial officers, or judicial candidates for misconduct. Details of attorneys’ and judges’ actions for which they are being disciplined by the Supreme Court will be included unless they are not a matter of public record under the court’s rules.

Suspension
Trezanay M. Atkins, of Marion County, has been suspended for at least two years without automatic reinstatement for stealing funds from the Marion County Bar Association while serving as treasurer. (Read more on page 29.)

Amanda A. Johnson, of Madison County, has had her suspension for noncooperation converted to an indefinite suspension. The Indiana Supreme Court converted her suspension Sept. 25, noting more than six months have passed since she was suspended due to noncooperation with the disciplinary process. To be readmitted to practice, she must cure all the causes of suspension in effect and petition for reinstatement.

Randall B. Stiles, of Allen County, has had his suspension for noncooperation converted to an indefinite suspension. The Indiana Supreme Court converted his suspension Sept. 25, noting more than six months have passed since he was suspended due to noncooperation with the disciplinary process. To be readmitted to practice, he must cure all the causes of suspension in effect and petition for reinstatement.

Bradley D. Hamilton, of Howard County, has been suspended for noncooperation, per a Sept. 25 action from the Supreme Court. His suspension began immediately and remains in effect until he fully cooperates with the Disciplinary Commission, the investigation or any disciplinary proceedings are disposed of, or until further order from the court. He must pay $512.96 for costs of prosecuting the proceeding. Hamilton abandoned his law practice in 2013 and allegedly left the country, without informing clients. The Disciplinary Commission sought to suspend his license in April for noncooperation.

Probation extension
The Indiana Supreme Court has extended the probation of Patrick M. Schrems, of Monroe County, for two more years after discovering he violated the terms of the probation imposed after he was conditionally reinstated in August 2012. When his probation was originally imposed, Schrems was not working as an attorney, so he agreed he would notify the Disciplinary Commission of his return to practice within a week of doing so. The commission discovered he began practicing law as early as January 2013 and failed to notify the commission. It sought to revoke his probation.

Schrems claimed he was working part time with cases accepted in consultation with his JLAP monitor, and he “mistakenly” thought he only had to notify the commission if he returned to practice full time. The justices decided to extend the probation by two years instead of revoking it as the Disciplinary Commission requested. Any violation may result in revocation of the probation and suspension without automatic reinstatement. Chief Justice Rush did not participate.•

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