IndyBar: Reflecting on 50 Years of Life in the Profession

iba-2550-celebraton-20191969 was undoubtedly historic and memorable. The Beatles held their last public performance on the roof of Apple Records, the Boeing 747 jumbo jet made its debut, 350,000 rock and roll fans attended Woodstock, and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first humans to take steps on the moon.

Events of 50 years ago remain clear in the minds of our colleagues who’ve been fortunate enough to have practiced law since then. We had the chance to talk with a few of them to gain insight into just a few of the things that have changed and the advice they have for practitioners today. Read on and register now to celebrate their accomplishments at the IndyBar Practice Milestone Reception on May 9 at indybar.org/events!

__________

Hon. Sarah Evans Barker, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana

Can you recall one particularly funny or interesting moment from your career in law?

Yes — too many to retell! The best one was when I was a new judge presiding over an Eighth Amendment jail conditions case and did not know, when a prisoner complained of unsanitary health conditions, what crabs were. I do now.

What do you consider to be your greatest achievement thus far?

I have been privileged to be in a position to hold the door open for many extraordinary women lawyers who followed me through it.

What advice do you have for lawyers and judges today?

Learn how to live within your natural boundaries, cultivate a circle of utterly trustworthy girlfriends, grow things that keep you humble (gardens, pets, children, fruit trees), do something good on a regular basis for its own sake without expecting to be noticed or repaid, write letters and find something daily that makes you laugh out loud.

__________

Richard Darst, Cohen Garelick & Glazier PC

Can you recall one particularly funny or interesting moment from your career in law?

It was interesting seeing the Court of Appeals have the courage to reverse two consecutive adverse jury verdicts in one of my cases after two consecutive trial courts had improperly excluded evidence of sexual harassment.

What do you consider to be your greatest achievement thus far?

Obtaining multi-million-dollar verdicts in discrimination cases, being president of the 7th Circuit Bar Association, prosecuting the leaders of the Indiana Senate for political corruption and continuing to represent victims of discrimination.

What advice do you have for lawyers and judges today?

Give the courts as much help as you can. We ask them to do a tough job every day.

__________

Jack Moriarty, Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic

Can you recall one particularly funny or interesting moment from your career in law?

I was serving as a deputy prosecutor to gain trial experience. During voir dire, a prospective juror was asked by the judge if he knew any of the lawyers. Yes, he met the lawyer at the prosecutor’s table once at a reception. There was only one person sitting at the prosecutor’s table and it was me. I didn’t remember ever meeting the man. The judge asked, “Would your meeting with Mr. Moriarty influence your decision today?” The juror responded, “No, I wasn’t very impressed with him at that time.” The solemn courtroom erupted in laughter, including me. With the other jurors looking on, the judge asked, “Mr. Moriarty, would you like to excuse him from being a juror?” I responded laughing, “No, Your Honor, he will make a fine juror.” The man served as a juror and the defendant was convicted of first-degree burglary.

What do you consider to be your greatest achievement thus far?

My greatest achievement was marrying my wife of 53 years, resulting in a wonderful family of four children and nine grandchildren.

What advice do you have for lawyers and judges today?

Keep a balance between working hours and outside activities. Do not turn into a workaholic. The years go by quicker than you think. Take time off to be with your family and to see your children participate in activities. You only get one chance. Circulate in the community and participate in those activities that are meaningful to you. Treat your clients as you would treat a friend, and carefully check your work.•

Please enable JavaScript to view this content.

Story Continues Below