Articles

Despite riot, impeachment, business as usual for high court

At this fraught moment in American history, the Supreme Court of the United States is doing its best to keep its head down, going about its regular business and putting off as many politically charged issues as it can, including whether President Donald Trump’s tax returns must be turned over to prosecutors in New York.

Read More

Election Day shadowed by threats of legal challenges

Even before Election Day, the 2020 race was the most litigated in memory. President Donald Trump is promising more to come. The candidates and parties have enlisted prominent lawyers with ties to Democratic and Republican administrations should that litigation take on new urgency in the event of a close election in key states.

Read More

Supreme Court issues flurry of last-minute election orders

At first blush, the difference in outcomes at the U.S. Supreme Court in cases regarding the counting of absentee ballots seems odd because the high court typically takes up issues to harmonize the rules across the country. But elections are largely governed by states, and the rules differ from one state to the next.

Read More

Barrett confirmed to U.S. Supreme Court

Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals judge and University of Notre Dame Law School professor Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court late Monday by a deeply divided Senate, with Republicans overpowering Democrats to install President Donald Trump’s nominee days before the election and secure a likely conservative court majority for years to come.

Read More

Long lines of mourners pay respects to Ginsburg at Supreme Court

With crowds of admirers swelling outside, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was remembered Wednesday at the court by grieving family, colleagues and friends as a prophet for justice who persevered against long odds to become an American icon. Ginsburg “wanted to be an opera virtuoso, but became a rock star instead,” Chief Justice John Roberts said.

Read More

SCOTUS to stick with arguments via telephone for now

The Supreme Court said Wednesday it will start its new term next month the way it ended the last one, with arguments by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic and live audio available to the public. The latter decision came at least in part at the urging of teachers from Chief Justice John Roberts’ Indiana high school.

Read More

Thomas spoke, Roberts ruled in unusual Supreme Court term

Justice Clarence Thomas spoke and Chief Justice John Roberts ruled. The US Supreme Court’s most unusual term featured victories for immigrants, abortion rights, LGBTQ workers and religious freedoms. The usually quiet Thomas’ baritone was heard by the whole world when the coronavirus outbreak upended the court’s traditional way of doing business. When the biggest decisions were handed down, the chief justice was almost always in the majority and dictated the reach of the court’s most controversial cases, whether they were won by the left or the right.

Read More