Articles

What the ACLU of Indiana is tracking

he ACLU of Indiana is keeping an eye on bills that have been introduced this session and is anticipating others that could be introduced, including those that will affect due process, First Amendment rights, reproductive rights, voting rights, Second Amendment rights, and rights based on gender identity and sexual orientation, among other issues covered by the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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Judge unsure about ACLU student chapter

An Indianapolis-based federal judge wants to know more before he decides whether a student chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana has standing to seek class certification in a lawsuit against the Indiana Board of Law Examiners.

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ACLU wins day-old political-sign suit

Within a day of filing a federal lawsuit regarding Plainfield's ordinance restricting political campaign signs, the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana can claim another win on an issue that's becoming more prominent statewide.

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ACLU sponsors charter school discussion

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana's First Wednesdays are back in session starting Feb. 6 with a discussion about charter schools and school vouchers to occur at the same place and time as past First Wednesdays, noon to 12:50 p.m., at the Indiana Historical Society, 450 W. Ohio St.

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Going green topic of First Wednesday

The ACLU of Indiana's First Wednesday topic for Oct. 1 is "Going Green: Is Indianapolis doing enough?" Panelists for the event are Terry Black, owner of Greenway Supply; Linda Broadfoot, vice president of development and public relations for Keep Indianapolis Beautiful; and Jesse Kharbanda, executive director of the Hoosier Environmental Council. Matthew Tully, political columnist at the Indianapolis Star, will serve as the moderator.

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COA upholds Plainfield parks ban

The Indiana Constitution doesn't ensure a person's right to enter a public park, and that means a local law restricting sex offenders from visiting those areas isn't unconstitutional, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled today.

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