• AG Hill suspended for 30 days with automatic reinstatement

    Finding Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill guilty of misdemeanor battery and two related violations of the Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct, the Indiana Supreme Court has ordered him to serve a 30-day suspension.

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  • Man charged in judges’ shooting claims self-defense, says judges were aggressors

    The man charged with shooting two southern Indiana judges outside an Indianapolis fast food restaurant last year claimed in a Tuesday court filing that he acted in self-defense. The notice of affirmative defense also alleges the judges were the aggressors as alleged gunman Brandon Kaiser and his nephew, Alfredo Vazquez, were stopping to eat at a downtown White Castle, where the shooting took place in the parking lot.

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  • Wise counsel when moving between firms

    Law firm managers have long known they can’t require attorneys to sign noncompete agreements when they join a firm. Even so, there have still been instances where firms have made it challenging for a lawyer trying to make a lateral move. But a recent opinion from the American Bar Association Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility makes it clear that any provision of an employment agreement that interferes with a client’s autonomy is never acceptable.

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  • Hill accusers provide emotional testimony

    Testimony in the attorney discipline action against Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill continues Tuesday after emotional remarks Monday from the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct.

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Articles

Bell & Grass: When silence isn’t golden: The ethics ‘boom shakalaka’ defense

Under normal circumstances, we would try to fill this column with something useful. We would try to give you tips that may help your practice, and we would hope that our column would give you a teensy-weensy bit of knowledge that might help you avoid an ethical problem down the road. However, these are not normal circumstances, so we feel like offering something a little different.

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Despite lost support, AG Hill seemingly pushes forward

Statewide political leaders, including Republican leaders, are withdrawing support of embattled Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, who next week begins a 30-day suspension for two ethics violations. But Hill so far has not indicated plans to step down from his role or leave the 2020 campaign trail once the suspension is over, even though his competition may be growing.

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Disciplinary Actions

Read who has been reinstated, resigned or suspended from the practice of law in the most recent reporting period.

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Disciplinary Actions

Read which Indiana attorneys have been reprimanded or suspended from the practice of law during the most recent reporting period.

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Hill again urges dismissal of groping-related attorney discipline case

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill is continuing his fight to have his lawyer discipline case dismissed, writing in a brief to the Indiana Supreme Court that if he must be sanctioned, it should be no more than a reprimand. Hill is also drawing on the recent discipline of three Indiana judges involved in a downtown Indianapolis shooting to argue that the recommended discipline against him is unfair.

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Attorney accused of tax evasion suspended; 2 justices would disbar

A Schererville attorney previously arraigned in federal court on charges of tax evasion and failure to pay federal income taxes has been suspended from the practice of law for three years without automatic reinstatement, the Indiana Supreme Court ordered Tuesday. Some of the justices, however, said they would disbar the attorney.

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Stafford: Attorneys, heal thy profession: Answer victims’ calls for help

One of the saddest parts of my job is when a victim of an unscrupulous lawyer calls, asking in exasperation, “Is there anything that can be done about this?” The very saddest part is the realization that, deep down, the caller already knows the answer is no, or next to no. The legal profession has no contingency when one of its own who swore an oath goes rogue and steals from vulnerable clients. This must change.

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