Articles

Maley: Contempt order shows electronic case filing e-notice risks

For years now, all federal courts have been using ECF electronic filing along with electronic service of filings and court orders. This system offers great convenience and efficiencies, but in today’s litigation practices, with the seemingly nonstop, never-ending inflow of email, the risks of missing a court order are increased. This proved painful in a recent 7th Circuit decision.

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House resolution would make it easier to enforce subpoenas

A resolution being voted on Tuesday in the House would make it easier for Democrats to sue President Donald Trump’s administration and other potential witnesses who refuse to comply with subpoenas. The House resolution would authorize lawsuits against Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn for defying subpoenas pertaining to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

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Families not immune from vaccination debate

Arguments for and against vaccinations have grown in the national conversation as 12 states are currently battling an outbreak of measles. A recent Indiana trial court decision in a custody dispute demonstrated that disagreements over vaccinations also happen within families.

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Supreme Court to travel, invites amici in smartphone privacy case

The Indiana Supreme Court will hit the road early next year to hear oral argument in a first impression case involving smartphone privacy. Justices also have invited amicus parties in the case as they seek to determine whether law enforcement can force a woman to unlock her phone as part of a criminal investigation.

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Smartphone privacy ruling tests how technology affects rights

A consequential Indiana Court of Appeals ruling on an issue of first impression last month marked one of the first times state courts have been asked to reconcile civil rights with advancing technology. The question: considering the personal nature of the contents of a person’s smartphone, can an individual be forced to unlock a smartphone without violating the Fifth Amendment?

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