Articles

Gunmaker asks US Supreme Court to hear Sandy Hook appeal

The maker of the rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its appeal of a state ruling against the company. Remington Arms, based in Madison, North Carolina, cited a much-debated 2005 federal law that shields firearms manufacturers from liability in most cases when their products are used in crimes.

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Indiana landlord seeks Supreme Court’s help in land dispute

A northwestern Indiana landlord wants the U.S. Supreme Court to wade into his dispute with the city of Hammond and overturn a city order directing him to remove five apartments that he’s leased to tenants in what was once a single-family home. Jose Andrade, who argues that Hammond’s order violates his constitutional rights, has filed a petition for review with the nation’s highest court.

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Indiana fetal disposition law upheld by U.S. Supreme Court

Indiana’s law mandating that fetal remains be either buried or cremated has been upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States in a per curiam opinion issued Tuesday that found the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals had “clearly erred” in overturning the law. However, in the same opinion, the Supreme Court let stand a ruling which blocked another Indiana law that would have prevented abortions based on the gender, race or genetic abnormality of the fetus.  

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Indiana’s abortion ultrasound petition listed at U.S. Supreme Court

While the U.S. Supreme Court is still considering Indiana’s petition for a review of two abortion laws blocked by the lower courts, another abortion petition from the Hoosier state has been listed for the justices’ May 9 conference. Indiana filed a writ of certiorari Feb. 4, asking the Supreme Court to uphold its law requiring an ultrasound be performed on women seeking an abortion at least 18 hours before the procedure.

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Indiana, Ohio leading 6th Circuit appeal supporting law regulating Kentucky abortion clinics

The Hoosier state has filed its second abortion-related appeal this week, this time urging a federal appeals court to uphold states’ authority to regulate abortion clinics. Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill joined forces with Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost to lead a 16-state coalition in favor of a Kentucky law requiring abortion clinics to maintain transfer-and-transportation agreements with local hospitals and ambulance services.

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State, community group urge SCOTUS to reject Lake Michigan access case

The state of Indiana and a community group favoring public access to the shore of Lake Michigan have filed briefs urging the Supreme Court of the United States to reject an appeal that could partly privatize the state’s 45 miles of Great Lakes beaches. Briefs filed Friday urge the high court to affirm the Indiana Supreme Court ruling that found the public has a right to walk along the shore of Lake Michigan from the water’s edge to the ordinary high water mark.

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Indiana’s abortion petition relisted at U.S. Supreme Court

Indiana’s petition for a review of its 2016 abortion law is still pending at the Supreme Court of the United States after the justices relisted the Hoosier state’s writ of certiorari for this Friday’s conference. The state is asking the Supreme Court to overturn a preliminary injunction blocking the implementation of a law that limits when a woman may terminate her pregnancy and mandates how fetal remains should be handled.

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Fight over Indiana abortion law still waiting at U.S. Supreme Court

While the Supreme Court of the United States has yet to agree to hear an abortion rights case this term, a petition from Indiana regarding its law regulating the disposal of fetal remains and prohibiting women from terminating their pregnancies based on race, sex or disability remains under consideration. Indiana filed a writ of certiorari after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a preliminary injunction against 2016's House Enrolled Act 1337.

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High court won’t hear Evansville suit alleging coerced confessions

A lawsuit involving three teenagers who accuse Evansville police of violating their constitutional rights is headed to trial after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the case. The high court refused Monday to review a January ruling by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which found enough evidence to warrant a civil trial in the suit filed on behalf of William, Deadra and Andrea Hurt and their mother.

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