• Red flags on Indiana’s red flag law

    A mass shooting at an Indianapolis FedEx Ground facility earlier this month that killed eight employees and wounded five raised questions about whether more could have been done under Indiana’s red flag law to prevent the gunman from obtaining additional weapons after he had a firearm removed from his possession just over a year before.

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  • Police ID 2 guns used by FedEx shooter, cite white supremacist websites

    Police on Monday identified the two weapons used by Brandon Scott Hole when he shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis late last Thursday.

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  • FedEx gunman who killed 8, self was known to police

    The former employee who shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis was interviewed by FBI agents last year after his mother called police to say that her son might commit “suicide by cop,” the bureau said Friday. Authorities also released the names of the eight victims late Friday.

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Articles

Last-minute Statehouse gun reform efforts fail

With the Republicans having a supermajority, the Legislature has been consistent in passing bills that weaken restrictions on firearms. Legislation that Moms Demand Action and other organizations consider common sense, such as universal background checks and safe storage, face an uphill battle in the Indiana Statehouse.

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Mears: No red flag petition sought for FedEx shooter

The gunman in Indianapolis’ deadliest-ever mass shooting was never the subject of a court proceeding under Indiana’s red flag law, the Marion County Prosecutor said, because the suspect agreed to surrender a shotgun to law enforcement over concerns that he could be a danger to himself or others.

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Mass shooters exploited gun laws, loopholes before carnage

The suspect in the shooting at a Boulder, Colorado, supermarket was convicted of assaulting a high school classmate but still got a gun. The man accused of opening fire on three massage businesses in the Atlanta area bought his gun just hours before the attack — no waiting required. They are the latest suspected U.S. mass shooters to obtain guns because of limited firearms laws, background check lapses or law enforcement’s failure to heed warnings of concerning behavior.

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