• Web Exclusive: Lawyers debate how IP laws apply to NFTs

    Over the last three years, non-fungible tokens have gone from niche to mainstream. But with the new digital marketplace has come more questions than answers for lawyers — particularly in the realm of intellectual property.

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  • The new frontier: Indiana attorneys navigating name, image, likeness ‘Wild, Wild West’

    On June 21, 2021, the Supreme Court of the United States unanimously ruled the National Collegiate Athletic Association couldn’t prohibit athletes on teams at member schools from receiving certain education-related compensation. In affirming the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals’ opinion in NCAA, et al. v. Alston, et al., college athletes were given the green light to get paid for their names, images and likenesses. By June 30, the NCAA had released an interim NIL policy, providing general guidelines as to how universities and athletes could approach NIL business ventures while also complying with existing NCAA bylaws prohibiting “pay-for-play” arrangements.

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  • 10 years after America Invents Act, IP lawyers have mixed feelings on challenge provisions

    The America Invents Act sought to make the patent filing process easier, enabling American entrepreneurs and businesses to get inventions to the marketplace more quickly with fewer costs and unnecessary litigation. While that’s proven true for some, other members of the innovation community say those goals have been hit or miss over the last decade.

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  • Attorneys prepare for legal challenges posed by new collaborative advanced manufacturing hub

    A new smart manufacturing hub is coming to town this summer and gearing up to boost Indiana’s manufacturing industry. At its helm are two Hoosier attorneys who have deep roots in the state’s economic development, both of whom say the legal complexities of pursuing such a venture make the process interesting.

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Articles

Hartz: What’s intellectual property got to do with war in Ukraine?

Do you or your clients have operations or sales in Russia? It is not a popular place to be doing business right now. The physical conflict in Ukraine has spread to economic and political countermeasures, including various private companies voluntarily withdrawing from the Russian market. But the Russian government is striking back at U.S. and other companies who are pulling out of the market by modifying the Russian intellectual property systems.

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Kosc: Real regulation around artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence offers great potential to positively affect virtually all areas of our lives. There is, however, significant potential for abuse and harm resulting from irresponsible use of AI. These warnings have led to a growing body of regulation around AI, which seems likely to increase as this technology develops.

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Hartz: Social media sponsorship disclosures in 2021

As we enter peak gifting season, have you noticed an increase in the number of #ad or #sponsored posts in your social media feeds? While the holidays are one cause for this annual advertising bombardment, in parallel, enforcement of the unfair competition laws is leading to more sponsorship disclosures by content creators.

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IndyBar: IP at the Supreme Court in 2021

Professor Marshall Leaffer of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law will provide his thoughts on the Google v. Oracle decision in the upcoming IP at the Supreme Court in 2021 seminar hosted by the IndyBar on Sept. 10.

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Perry and Cahr: Important new laws will have ripple effect for IP owners, practitioners

A final surprise for 2020 emerged from December’s marathon omnibus spending and COVID-19 relief negotiations. Congress included a trio of notable and hotly debated intellectual property measures in its multi-trillion-dollar spending and relief package which could fundamentally alter the manner in which intellectual property owners protect and enforce their rights.

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