• Through friendships, visits, Ginsburg became part of Indiana legal history

    The late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg made many visits to Indiana during her tenure on the Supreme Court. She had friendships with the law professors and deans at the law schools in the Hoosier State, and she influenced law students, lawyers and judges across the state. “Imagine a young law student faced with the challenge by a Supreme Court Justice,” recalled a former IU Maruer law student who is now a federal judge.

    Read More
  • Zooming in: Lawyers describe pros and cons in remote oral arguments

    Though there have been some technical hiccups, lawyers report generally positive experiences with remote appellate oral arguments. Even so, some advocates say the most impactful arguments are made in person.

    Read More
  • Web Exclusive: Expungement wait period case awaits justices

    After more than 10 years with a criminal record, an Elkhart man successfully petitioned to reduce his felony conviction to a misdemeanor. But when he tried to expunge the conviction two years later, he faced an unexpected setback. The Indiana Supreme Court will decide whether he and others in his situation must wait longer for an expungement.

    Read More
  • Round trip: Indiana COA hears arguments in all 92 counties

    The Indiana Court of Appeals has wrapped up its pursuit of visiting every county through its Appeals on Wheels program. Introduced during the appellate court’s centennial in 2001, the traveling program has ventured statewide to high schools, colleges, law schools and other venues, promoting civics education by inviting local communities to observe how the appellate judiciary works.

    Read More

Articles

Challenges to Indiana voting laws pile up in 7th Circuit, which will livestream one today

Indiana’s prohibition against no-excuse absentee voting goes before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday afternoon, with the plaintiffs trying to convince the appellate panel to reverse the district judge’s ruling and allow all registered Hoosier voters to cast their ballots by mail in the Nov. 3 presidential election. The federal appeals court will livestream oral arguments in the case.

Read More

SCOTUS to stick with arguments via telephone for now

The Supreme Court said Wednesday it will start its new term next month the way it ended the last one, with arguments by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic and live audio available to the public. The latter decision came at least in part at the urging of teachers from Chief Justice John Roberts’ Indiana high school.

Read More

Pandemic means a silent June at the Supreme Court

The coronavirus pandemic has kept justices of the United States Supreme Court from their courtroom since March and forced them to change their ways in many respects. Now, in their season of weighty decisions, instead of the drama that can accompany the announcement of a majority decision and its biting dissent, the court’s opinions are being posted online without an opportunity for the justices to be heard.

Read More

Supreme Court appears likely to reject Trump immunity claim

The United States Supreme Court on Tuesday appeared likely to reject President Donald Trump’s claim that he is immune from criminal investigation while in office. But the court seemed less clear about exactly how to handle subpoenas from Congress and the Manhattan district attorney for Trump’s tax, bank and financial records.

Read More

Supreme Court to hear clash over Trump tax, bank records

The Supreme Court of the United States on Tuesday will take up President Donald Trump’s bid to keep his tax, bank and financial records private, a major clash over presidential accountability that could affect the  2020 presidential campaign.

Read More