Articles

Indiana courts among busiest for employment filings

In the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, busy dockets are common across all case types. Recent data confirmed that trend specifically with respect to employment law, finding the Indianapolis-based courts are among the busiest in employment litigation for all of the Midwest.

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Fox & Williams Next goal for U.S. Women’s Soccer Team: Scoring equal pay

The U.S. Women’s National Team did not lose a match in route to their fourth World Cup title. When they returned home, the nation celebrated the team’s victory with numerous national TV appearances and a ticker tape parade. However, while the team reveled in victory, one battle stood ahead — not on the field, but in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

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Mosby & Loeffler: Examining impacts of Indiana minimum wage law changes

On April 3, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed Senate Enrolled Act 231, excluding a direct seller from the definition of “employee” under the state’s minimum wage law (Indiana Code § 22-2-2 et. seq.) and from the definition of “employment” under the state’s unemployment compensation system (I.C. 22-4 et. seq.), except under certain conditions. The law took effect July 1.

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Bowling: Takin’ care of business … and gettin’ overtime

We all know the general rule about overtime: the Fair Labor Standards Act requires employees must be paid 150 percent of their standard rate of pay, or “time and a half,” for working more than 40 hours per week, but certain employees, especially executive or managerial employees, are exempt. In practice, the line between exempt and non-exempt employees is sometimes unclear, especially with respect to restaurant and retail employees.

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Elkhart man wins wage dispute, but judge awards just $35

A northern Indiana man who sought wages for lunch breaks he didn’t take has won his claim, although a judge awarded him just $35. Joe Lehman was seeking $3,543 he said Thor Industries’ Postle Aluminum division owed him for lunch breaks he didn’t take while working as a truck driver for about a year and a half, but an Elkhart County magistrate granted him a judgment of only $35, plus $125 in court costs.

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