In This Issue of Indiana Lawyer

SEPT. 25 – OCT. 8, 2013

Daniel Brewington is either a poster child for the wrongful prosecution of free speech or a man whose online rants about a judge constituted criminal threats. It all depends on your point of view.    After a Lake Superior Court declared parts of Indiana's right-to-work law unconstitutional, those on either side of the debate are anticipating taking their case to the appellate court.  And 50 years after the enactment of the Equal Pay Act, does gender equality remain the "elephant in the conference room" at some law firms?

Top StoriesBack to Top

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Gun seizure case presents first impression issue

A man whose 51 guns were ordered seized by a judge who determined him dangerous after his behavior alarmed Bloomington police near the site where missing Indiana University student Lauren Spierer was last seen is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to return his firearms.

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Are law offices gender neutral?

Equal work deserves equal pay. That was the mantra of those lobbying for the Equal Pay Act in 1963. President John F. Kennedy signed the bill into law, giving everyone, regardless of race or sex, the right to be paid equally for the same job.

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FocusBack to Top

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Mediating Justices: Former justices find that ADR is often a fertile field for life after the court

After years deciding disputes in the state’s highest court, two former justices now devote at least part of their practices to helping feuding parties find their own resolutions.

Former Indiana Supreme Court Justices Ted Boehm and Myra Selby each count corporate clients in their mediation and alternative dispute resolution portfolios, Boehm with Van Winkle Baten Dispute Resolution and Selby with Ice Miller LLP.

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Special task force going word-by-word through ADR rules

Although the privacy of mediation has been affirmed by the Indiana Supreme Court, the possibility that confidential conversations could become public highlighted the need to clarify and possibly change the state’s rules for alternative dispute resolution.

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OpinionBack to Top

Dean’s Desk: Blend of theory and practice will make Tech Law unique

In August of this year, Indiana Tech Law School opened its doors in Fort Wayne with a commitment to changing the way legal education prepares students. Despite the national news reporting that there are too many law schools and not enough jobs and the Internet blogs criticizing all new start-ups as a waste of a student’s money, Indiana Tech Law School was established, in part, to respond to the criticism that law schools are not adequately training students to become effective legal professionals.

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Bell & Gaerte: 3 things to know about legal advertising

The Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct define the term “advertising” broadly. Ind. Professional Conduct Rule 7.2(a) defines “advertising” as “any manner of communication partly or entirely intended or expected to promote the purchase or use of professional services.” (Emphasis added) Therefore, these rules cover communications on your website, blog and even social media. Regardless of whether or not you advertise on billboards, you likely need to pay attention to the advertising rules. Here are three things to know about legal advertising.

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In BriefBack to Top

Daily News — Sept. 25, 2013 issue

Friends and family honor IBF Legendary Lawyer Henry Ryder The reception honoring retired Indianapolis attorney Henry Ryder included lots of stories. About 120 friends, family and colleagues gathered at the downtown office of Barnes & Thornburg LLP to recognize Ryder on his selection to receive the Indiana Bar Foundation’s 2013 Legendary Lawyer Award. Ryder Before […]

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Disciplinary ActionsBack to Top

Bar AssociationsBack to Top