• Barrett ascends to high court

    The newest — and youngest — justice ascended to the nation’s highest court just shy of three years after her confirmation to the federal bench from the classrooms of her alma mater, the University of Notre Dame Law School.

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  • Hoosier nominee: Barrett stands on Ginsburg’s shoulders to continue Scalia’s work

    Amy Coney Barrett, a devout Catholic and mother of seven, has been a favorite of social conservatives. However, her confirmation is already inciting partisan fighting, coming just weeks before the Nov. 3 presidential election. Republican senators are preparing for a swift process with her hearing before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee scheduled for Oct. 12 and possibly her nomination being sent to the Senate floor by late October.

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  • Through friendships, visits, Ginsburg became part of Indiana legal history

    The late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg made many visits to Indiana during her tenure on the Supreme Court. She had friendships with the law professors and deans at the law schools in the Hoosier State, and she influenced law students, lawyers and judges across the state. “Imagine a young law student faced with the challenge by a Supreme Court Justice,” recalled a former IU Maruer law student who is now a federal judge.

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  • Trump nominates conservative Amy Coney Barrett for court

    President Donald Trump on Saturday nominated Hoosier Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the United States Supreme Court, capping a dramatic reshaping of the federal judiciary that will resonate for a generation and that he hopes will provide a needed boost to his reelection effort.

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Articles

Barrett confirmed to U.S. Supreme Court

Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals judge and University of Notre Dame Law School professor Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court late Monday by a deeply divided Senate, with Republicans overpowering Democrats to install President Donald Trump’s nominee days before the election and secure a likely conservative court majority for years to come.

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Barrett vows no ‘agenda’ on high court

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is vowing to bring no “agenda” to the court, batting back senators’ questions Tuesday on abortion, gun rights and the November election, insisting she would take a conservative approach to the law but decide cases as they come.

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Barrett vows to interpret laws ‘as they are written’

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett declared Monday that Americans “deserve an independent Supreme Court that interprets our Constitution and laws as they are written,” encapsulating her conservative approach to the law that has Republicans excited about the prospect of her taking the place of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day.

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Democrats ask if more material omitted from Barrett response

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee are calling on the Justice Department to provide any missing materials from a questionnaire completed by Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Confirmation hearings for the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals judge and Notre Dame law professor remain scheduled to begin next week.

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Hammerle on… The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — Now what?

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been devasting to many, including me. She became only the second woman to serve on the court, and her reputation was legendary. In her memory, movie reviewer Bob Hammerle reprises his reviews of “RBG” and “On the Basis of Sex,” both released in 2018 and both of which should be required viewing for all law students.

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IndyBar President’s Column: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — A Reflection in Her Own Words

Despite her personal achievements as a Supreme Court litigator and justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was quick to recognize that “the work of perfection is scarcely done. Many stains remain . . . [W]e still struggle to achieve greater understanding and appreciation of each other across racial, religious and socioeconomic lines.” But, again, these impediments were an opportunity for Justice Ginsburg to “strive to realize the ideal — to become a more perfect union.”

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