• User-friendly data: Lawyer-technologists launch new software to address e-discovery problems

    A developer of software that comprehensively tracks e-discovery progress in real time describes his team’s inspiration this way: “What we tried to do was take away some of the barriers because people go to law school to be lawyers not to learn software or how to put together Excel spreadsheets … We wanted to create something that was the path of least resistance for people. They just log in and get all the critical information they need.”

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  • New firms juggle business challenges, pandemic pressures

    Hanging a shingle is always risky. Add a pandemic to the mix and you’ve got a recipe for stress. Most lawyers across Indiana felt the pinch of the COVID-19-induced economic downturn in some fashion. But those who made career moves in the months before the pandemic say the recession has put their business acumen to the test.

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  • A brave new chapter: AI tackles legal writing

    A well-written opinion or brief can change the course of legal thought, but while other parts of the practice of law have been upended by technology, the physical act of writing remains pretty much a job done by humans. However, new artificial intelligence software appears poised to rewrite the definition of writing.

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  • Big data is predicting outcomes in court

    Big data is growing in importance, and corporate legal departments, despite being slower to adapt initially, are increasingly utilizing data analytics as part of their practices, according to a 2019 report. But despite all the hype, big data, by itself, cannot do a thing.

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Articles

Start Page: Digital evidence pilot program clears preflight checklist

The Hamilton County courts have been piloting, in select family law cases, a program for the online submission of trial exhibits through a website called CaseLines, part of Thomson Reuters. Attorneys and their teams can log in to a website, upload their digital exhibits for a hearing and the participants have access to those files for the hearing. The website is one place where the exhibits are stored and all participants can access at the hearing.

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Start Page: Reduce cost of smartphone ownership: Limit interruptions

Over the next few articles, I will share some thoughts on setting your devices up for a “palm practice” (practicing law from the palm of your hand). Most lawyers now have smartphones or devices with us every day. But, with great power comes great responsibility. While these tools are helpful, they can also increase the sense that we should always be working on something.

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Mizzell: You can’t ignore texts and chat messages in e-discovery

Texts and chat messages are informal and fragmented forms of communication that can be hard to address in both written discovery and the technical collection of documents. So here are a few suggestions to help attorneys who are just starting to grapple with this developing area of electronic discovery.

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Start Page: IPad OS update gives you permission to Scribble

For a long time, I’ve wanted a legal pad app for my iPad that could reliably turn my handwriting into text. The iPad and Apple Pencil should do this well, but there was too much friction in getting the text to be recognized and usable. That’s all changed with the latest iPad OS update. Apple gives users Scribble — the ability to hand-write in any field on the iPad and the iPad will turn handwriting into text, almost instantly. This is a serious tool.

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