Articles

Dreyer: For judges, reform is the norm: Our requirements

There was a time, not so long ago, when judges were “potted plants.” The judicial role was widely reserved, somewhat withdrawn, apart from public statement or positions, and any work to change the legal system was considered improper. Changing standards and challenging times seem to have changed all that.

Read More

Dreyer: Pandemic positives: Confronting the bear

As COVID-19 numbers descend, we are left with a plethora of mixed feelings. Many are overwhelmed with joy and giddiness. Some are still numb and can’t feel anything — yet. And others are trying to make sense of the past two years and the lasting realities that lay ahead. Our courts and judges fit into the latter category.

Read More

Veteran Marion Superior Judge Dreyer to step down after 2020

Longtime Marion Superior Judge David Dreyer will step down after 23 years on the bench when his term expires at the end of 2020, he announced Tuesday. Dreyer, 63, a 23-year judge who has presided in civil and criminal cases on the state trial court bench in Indianapolis, said in a news release that he intends to seek senior judge status and continue hearing cases.

Read More

Indiana Judges Association: Trials inside, outside the courtroom

All of us lawyers live two lives. One is the world of daily work endeavors — cases, clients, decisions, deadlines and problem-solving. The other life of lawyers and judges is the non-legal real world, away from smartphones and computers, outside our office, and outside the courtroom where experiences of family, friends, and private interests fill our personal time.

Read More

Indiana Judges Association: Judging from the mountaintop

If judges wore wigs in the United States, there might be a marked increase, I say, in public confidence in our courts. Hopefully, it would not be outweighed by any marked increase in public satire, but it could not be any worse than the judge shows now on daytime TV. The public always needs to understand that courts are serious and judges are different. More importantly, it is necessary to understand why.

Read More