• Web Exclusive: Expungement wait period case awaits justices

    After more than 10 years with a criminal record, Naveed Gulzar successfully petitioned to reduce his felony conviction to a misdemeanor. But when he tried to expunge the conviction two years later, Gulzar faced an unexpected setback. The Indiana Supreme Court will decide whether Gulzar and others in his situation must wait longer for an expungement.

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Articles

Kuzma appointed to Legal Services Corp. board

A former Indiana assistant attorney general who founded a major Indianapolis-based legal aid organization has been appointed to the national board that oversees federal funding for civil legal aid service providers across the United States.

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Justices’ rent-to-own ruling helps consumers, lawyers say

The Indiana Supreme Court reviewed a dispute over a rent-to-own contract and determined the family who had been living in the home were renters, not buyers. The ruling in Rainbow Realty Group, Inc., et al. v. Katrina Carter and Quentin Lintner, might give families who enter rent-to-buy contracts some remedy to prevent their dreams of homeownership from becoming a nightmare.

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Study: Indiana legal aid agencies return $6.70 for every dollar invested

A recent study examined 12 separate legal services agencies around Indiana and calculated the organizations’ social return on investment. The group dug into the financials for the year 2017 and concluded that for every $1 invested in Indiana legal aid that year, the state received $6.70 in immediate and long-term financial benefits.

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Rent-to-own lawsuits rise in federal, state courts

Katrina Carter and Quentin Lintner are continuing to fight for their piece of the American dream even after the Indiana Court of Appeals closed the door on their attempt to get restitution from the company that put them in an uninhabitable home under a rent-to-own contract. They are not alone in litigation arising from such arrangements.

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Study: Legal needs rise despite available aid

Despite a continued need for legal representation, few Americans hire attorneys. Legal aid experts said there are two questions the legal community should consider: what’s keeping people, particularly those from low-income communities, from hiring legal help; and how can the profession reverse the trend?

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